Zines

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more. With contributions from: Ralph Coon, Brendan DeVallance, Liam Hayes, Malcolm Riviera, Dan Sutherland, and Lucien Williams.

As editor Russ Forster writes, "I have always endeavored to make 8-Track Mind Magazine a bastion of individual expression, be it nostalgic or otherwise. Perhaps this has always been the true quest for the magazine: to encourage a contrarian, individualistic experience of the spoils of consumer society as a way to resist being a tool for the amoral beneficiaries of consumerism."

Comes with a full-color 8-track centerfold. 40 pages, half-letter size. 

 

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management. Plus a piece about names from Marcy Donelson. 

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

Last copy! The ten-year anniversary issue of Basic Paper Airplane! Short essays about trying to make a living from writing words. Comic nightmares from the world of freelance writing, night school, weekly papers, and cities of books.

Paper airplane examples throughout. 32 pages, cut half-letter size.

Last two copies! Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip.

32 pages, half-letter size. Color cover, B&W inside.

Last two copies! In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most. 

Clock Tower Nine contributors from Seattle, Tukwila, Minneapolis, and Cleveland weigh in on a range of topics including: 8-track tapes, lonely videogames, losing battles on the bus, The Zombies, the Ultimate Warrior, struggling with religion after a horrible accident, and more.

36 pages, blue and teal risograph-printed cover.

One of our favorite Seattle zines is back with tales from the record store counter, long walks in various locales, dangerous doppelgängers, and 8-track tapes. 

As Clock Tower Nine ringleader Danny Noonan describes it in the introduction: "This fanzine is like a bunch of people sitting around a fire in late fall, all taking turns telling a story."

24 pages, half-letter size.

It's finally here: the new zine from our all-time best-selling zinester, Gina Sarti! Welcome to DRIVEL, her new zine series, an old-school variety zine in all its glory. You never know what you're going to get when you turn the page! It's fun. This first issue is broadly themed around all things new.

Within: new words, new homes, new calls to action, new motivations. In-depth interviews with new loves and new friends. A "what's in your bag?" with Robert Eggplant (Absolutely Zippo, Blatz). Highlight: a personal history of weird group living situations, from Olympia to Oakland. 

44 pages, half-letter size.

Since 1991, Fluke has been creating great variety zines covering all realms of punk and underground culture. This new issue is particularly PACKED with goodness. Interviews with graphic novelist Nate Powell (March, Any EmpireSwallow Me Whole), mural artist Danny Martin, and skateboard magazine historian Kevin Marks (Look Back Library). Personal histories on Maximum Rocknroll, R.E.M., '90s women-led punk, the Soophie Nun Squad family tree, and so much more. 

Contributions from John Pugh, Anna Marie Armstrong, Mark Dober, Jane Mabrysmith, Laura Walden, and Jessie Lynn McMains.

52 pages, half-letter size.

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys. A fascinating in-depth interview with graffiti historian Susan A. Phillips (The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles GraffitiWallbangin'). Linda Kite on her life with D Boon of Minutemen and seeing the '80s L.A. punk scene as conceptual art. Sergej Vutuc's dream-like skateboarding photography. Gary Floyd (of Dicks and Sister Double Happiness) on being a gay Texan punk in the 1970s and touring with Nirvana the year Nevermind broke. And legendary train-graffiti artist buZ blurr (AKA- Colossus of Roads) at the center of everything, holding everyone together. 

56 pages, cut half-letter size.