Zines

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more. With contributions from: Ralph Coon, Brendan DeVallance, Liam Hayes, Malcolm Riviera, Dan Sutherland, and Lucien Williams.

As editor Russ Forster writes, "I have always endeavored to make 8-Track Mind Magazine a bastion of individual expression, be it nostalgic or otherwise. Perhaps this has always been the true quest for the magazine: to encourage a contrarian, individualistic experience of the spoils of consumer society as a way to resist being a tool for the amoral beneficiaries of consumerism."

Comes with a full-color 8-track centerfold. 40 pages, half-letter size. 

 

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management. Plus a piece about names from Marcy Donelson. 

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

Short essays about trying to make a living from writing words. Comic nightmares from the world of freelance writing, night school, weekly papers, and cities of books.

Paper airplane examples throughout. 32 pages, cut half-letter size.

It's finally here: the new zine from our all-time best-selling zinester, Gina Sarti! Welcome to DRIVEL, her new zine series, an old-school variety zine in all its glory. You never know what you're going to get when you turn the page! It's fun. This first issue is broadly themed around all things new.

Within: new words, new homes, new calls to action, new motivations. In-depth interviews with new loves and new friends. A "what's in your bag?" with Robert Eggplant (Absolutely Zippo, Blatz). Highlight: a personal history of weird group living situations, from Olympia to Oakland. 

44 pages, half-letter size.

Since 1991, Fluke has been creating great variety zines covering all realms of punk and underground culture. This new issue is particularly PACKED with goodness. Interviews with graphic novelist Nate Powell (March, Any EmpireSwallow Me Whole), mural artist Danny Martin, and skateboard magazine historian Kevin Marks (Look Back Library). Personal histories on Maximum Rocknroll, R.E.M., '90s women-led punk, the Soophie Nun Squad family tree, and so much more. 

Contributions from John Pugh, Anna Marie Armstrong, Mark Dober, Jane Mabrysmith, Laura Walden, and Jessie Lynn McMains.

52 pages, half-letter size.

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys. A fascinating in-depth interview with graffiti historian Susan A. Phillips (The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles GraffitiWallbangin'). Linda Kite on her life with D Boon of Minutemen and seeing the '80s L.A. punk scene as conceptual art. Sergej Vutuc's dream-like skateboarding photography. Gary Floyd (of Dicks and Sister Double Happiness) on being a gay Texan punk in the 1970s and touring with Nirvana the year Nevermind broke. And legendary train-graffiti artist buZ blurr (AKA- Colossus of Roads) at the center of everything, holding everyone together. 

56 pages, cut half-letter size.

Mini story-essays about tigers, Henri Rousseau, Yelp as a personal blog, Jorge Luis Borges, freight elevator rides, landlords with enemies, and more.

32 pages, quarter-size.

A buffet of wildly different work from cartoonists, essayists, poets, and illustrators. With contributions from some of our faves: Jeff Miller (Ghost Pine) on the childhood confusion caused by a Sex Pistols tape, comic artist John Porcellino (King Cat Comics) on hidden creeks, Cherry Styles (Synchronise Witches Press) on natural skin care, and comic artist Jason Martin (Black Tea) on underrated albums.

Plus so much more from: Rob Jackson, Brigid Elva, Grace Denton, Nathan Penlington, Ben Gwalchmai, Joff Winterhart, Timothy Senior, Meriel Harrison, Maxim Peter Griffin, Iona Fox, Jayde Perkin, Jeff Miller, Delaine Derry Green, Andrew White, Dan Cooper, Jacob Knill, Sabba Khan, Peony Gent. Edited by Simon Moreton and Ali Bamford.

52 pages, magazine size.

 

Last copy! Though The Lowbrow Reader makes itself out to be a low-quality bathroom reader it is, in reality, a one-of-a-kind zine that holds some of the wisest and oddest essays about bygone pop culture and its fringes.

In this issue: famed cartoonist Drew Friedman writes about his love for Shemp Howard of the Three Stooges. Fast Times at Ridgemont High & Clueless director Amy Heckerling digs up a private diary. Engel Schmidl covers the bizarre and wonderful life of outsider artist Bill Morrison, the Balloon Man. Brian Adams relates Mel Brooks memories. And editor Jay Ruttenberg writes a glorious, sprawling essay that connects the Velvet Underground to Steve Urkel.

Plus illustrations from Jeffrey Lewis, Doreen Kirchner, Alex Eben Meyer, Mike Reddy, former Silver Jews frontman David Berman, and Gilbert Gottfried.

40 pages, half-letter size.