Zines

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management. Plus a piece about names from Marcy Donelson. 

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

The best zine about zines around. Within: Sarah Mirk's joy-inducing stories about her Year of Zines project. Corinne Halbert's "Zany Zinetiquette" comics. Gianni Simone's stories of how his early 2000s zines led to becoming a freelance writer in Japan. Ed Kemp and Mark Cunning's home copier treatises. Todd Taylor's personal history of Razorcake frugality. Liz Mason's hilarious Quimby's "Zine Data Mining." Brian Polk's brilliant imagined zines.

Not to mention words and pictures from zine superstars like: Anna Jo Beck, Nyx, Jenna Freedman, Mike Faloon, Johnnie B. Baker, and Ed Tillman.

Cover art by Sarah Mirk. 40 pages, half-letter size.

Each issue of Behind the Zines is such a joy to read and warms my heart so much. Zine lifers, independent publishers, and artists of all stripes gather together to tell stories that never otherwise get told. (Like, in this issue, Todd Taylor of Razorcake's journey into a warehouse postal audit with rejected snake meat and live chickens.)

This issue's highlight: an essay from our own Gina Sarti about the ten-year anniversary of her ridiculously popular zine Shit's Fucked: A Positivity Guide. It's the rare story of making tons of lovely connections by way of a small zine that randomly went viral on Reddit a decade ago and never stopped.

Close-second highlight: Jonathan Valelly's deep-dive into the Broken Pencil Zine Awards—a massive, wonderful operation (that old-school zinesters love to hate on).

There's also: zine tattoos, first-time zinesters, postal bliss, experimental hip-hop collective zines, the pandemic zine fest scene, the most unwanted zine, anarchist zine printing, retro zine reviews, and an interview with Jolie Ruin (of The Escapist Artist).

32 pages, half-letter size. 

 

Behind the Zines is a zine about zines. Think of it as a small-scale Broken Pencil or Xerography Debt, a biannual publication that puts a spotlight on what's going on in the zine community. In this issue: scene reports, zine fest travels, zine spreadsheets, zine reluctance, and zine reviews. It asks how personal is too personal, and includes an interview with Kara Comegys of the zine Clumsy, discussing zines, sexual assault, and using art to heal. It also has the results of a zine survey, so there's even zine pie charts, statistics, and graphs.

Contributors include: Billy McCall (Proof I Exist), Jess Hogan (Neither/Nor Distro), Jake McWilliams (Making Edible Playdough is Hegemonic), Kelly Shortandqueer (Shortandqueer zine), Keith Helt (Flotation Device), Anna Jo Beck (Biff Boff Bam Sock), Ed Tillman, Ed Chops (The Word Distro), Frederick Moe (Tin Can Telephone), Jessica Mills, Giz, and Kari Tervo (Shards Of Glass In Your Eye!).

40 pages, half-letter size.

Our favorite zine about zines. And there's just so much good. Kate Foray and Dan Nelson discuss the upswing in wrestling zines. Frederick Moe dives into amateur press associations. Jess Hogan tells the nontraditional story of Neither/Nor Distro and how it can work in other places. Plus words, interviews, and features from some of our faves: Anna Jo Beck, Julia Eff, Kari Tervo, Saeko Reed, and so many more.

Highlight: Razorcake co-founder Todd Taylor gives a brief history of the magazine. Which includes a peek into the legendary Flipside and the interlinked cultures of punk, zines, and vinyl. (And there's also a great zine crossword to boot.)

40 pages, half-letter size.

The latest issue of newest best zine about zines around. Within: the evolution of DIY comics culture, zine-fest history, imagined zines, One Punk's Guide to collaborative zines, a history of that one Crimethinc poster, The Most Unwanted Zine, confessions of a sex-zine zinester, an interview with the Dear Diary Zine Fest, and more.

Pieces from some of our favorite folks: our very own Gina Sarti (DRIVEL), John Porcellino (King Cat), Todd Taylor (Razorcake), Liz Mason (Caboose), Ed Kemp (I Fucking Love This Album), Frederick Moe (Tin Can Telephone), and many many more.

44 pages, half-letter size.

The first four full issues of Behind the Zines: A Zine About Zines, or 164 pages and two-plus years of zine culture thoughts, essays, histories, ideas, advice, comics, and discussions.

Buy the 4-pack, save a couple bucks on the cover price and shipping costs, and get them all. 

Doris #30 is full of so many treasures: capturing a swarm of bees, finding community in new places, telling tour stories, forming study groups, and so much more. In it's longest and most vital piece, Cindy interviews sexual abuse survivors and meditates on how to think differently about accountability processes.

32 pages, half-legal size.

Farm & Wilderness Report Zine #1 focuses on the entwined histories of Total Loss Farm and Montague Farm as part of a deep dive into the communal farm movement and underground press movement of the 1960s and early '70s.

This zine revises and combines the information from the first and second Farm & Wilderness Report zines, while also kicking off a new zine series. 

48 pages, half-letter size.