Zines

Last copy! The first issue of Fred Thomas' Balcony, a highly enjoyable take on the now-rare music-focused variety zine. Balcony is a joy. The brilliant opening essay (on the naming of zines and bands and season three of Jersey Shore) brought me back to a golden era of zines that I often long for, and the rest of the zine stays on this bright path with a short history of post-punk, a list, and an interview with sound artist Andrea Pensado...[ continued ]

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

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"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management...[ continued ]

The best zine about zines around. Within: Sarah Mirk's joy-inducing stories about her Year of Zines project. Corinne Halbert's "Zany Zinetiquette" comics. Gianni Simone's stories of how his early 2000s zines led to becoming a freelance writer in Japan. Ed Kemp and Mark Cunning's home copier treatises. Todd Taylor's personal history of Razorcake frugality. Liz Mason's hilarious Quimby's "Zine Data Mining...[ continued ]

Behind the Zines is a zine about zines. Think of it as a small-scale Broken Pencil or Xerography Debt, a biannual publication that puts a spotlight on what's going on in the zine community. In this issue: scene reports, zine fest travels, zine spreadsheets, zine reluctance, and zine reviews. It asks how personal is too personal, and includes an interview with Kara Comegys of the zine Clumsy, discussing zines, sexual assault, and using art to heal...[ continued ]

Our favorite zine about zines. And there's just so much good. Kate Foray and Dan Nelson discuss the upswing in wrestling zines. Frederick Moe dives into amateur press associations. Jess Hogan tells the nontraditional story of Neither/Nor Distro and how it can work in other places. Plus words, interviews, and features from some of our faves: Anna Jo Beck, Julia Eff, Kari Tervo, Saeko Reed, and so many more...[ continued ]

The latest issue of newest best zine about zines around. Within: the evolution of DIY comics culture, zine-fest history, imagined zines, One Punk's Guide to collaborative zines, a history of that one Crimethinc poster, The Most Unwanted Zine, confessions of a sex-zine zinester, an interview with the Dear Diary Zine Fest, and more.

Pieces from some of our favorite folks: our very own Gina Sarti (Shit's Fucked, Drivel), John Porcellino (King Cat), Todd Taylor (Razorcake), Liz Mason (Caboose), Ed Kemp (I Fucking Love This Album), Frederick Moe (Tin Can Telephone), and many many more...[ continued ]

Farm & Wilderness Report Zine #1 focuses on the entwined histories of Total Loss Farm and Montague Farm as part of a deep dive into the communal farm movement and underground press movement of the 1960s and early '70s.

This zine revises and combines the information from the first and second Farm & Wilderness Report zines, while also kicking off a new zine series...[ continued ]

The second issue of the excellent movies of the 1930s zine, A Great and Terrible Golden Age. Within: a Joan Crawford rich person solo sport montage, Soviet sci-fi, the pompous genius of "the fifth Marx Brother" Margaret Dumont, Greta Garbo's only rom-com, and Ernst Lubitsch galore!

Contributions from Emily Alden Foster, Bethany Simard, Yvonne Li, Emily Parrish, Lindsey Simard, Robert Dynamite, Tessa Brunton, and Joshua James Amberson...[ continued ]

An entire issue of A Great and Terrible Golden Age dedicated to the one-and-only Claudette Colbert. Essays and comics about her controversial (and motion picture industry-altering) boobs in Cecil B. DeMille's 1932 film The Sign of the Cross and her year of ruling Hollywood (1934) when she made It Happened One Night, Cleopatra, Four Frightened People, and Imitation of Life...[ continued ]