Zines

A sweet personal zine about all the people in Frederick Moe's life that have stepped in as a father when he needed one. Talking about his work in mental health care and disability rights along the way.

12 pages, half-letter size.

Comics about summertime parenting, accidentally reading to kids at the library, road trips, therapy, print-making, post-election processing, and so much more.

64 pages, half-letter size, risograph-printed covers.

As always, Forever and Everything is a wonderful mix. Comics about parenting, being a teacher, and relatable pen issues mix with comics about hard times, systemic ills, and making tough choices. 

44 pages, half-letter size, risograph printed.

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The latest in cartoonist Kyle Bravo's autobiographical comics, this issue of Forever and Everything is the "feeling bad then feeling better" issue. Comics on parenting, depression, coffee, therapy, alcohol, Willie Nelson, Charlie Brown, and living in New Orleans.

36 pages, half-letter size, risograph printed.

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Temporary sale! Two poetry zines in one by Tomas Moniz. In A Poetic Theory of Plate Tectonics, he looks at bodies in relation to the various movements of the earth. And in A Reclamation of Manhood, he looks at past joys and mistakes in an attempt to unlearn the socialized expectations of what manhood and fatherhood looks like.

With art from Ajuan Mance, Robert Liu-Trujillo, and Alicia Dornadic...[ continued ]

Last copy! In this, the first issue of POPs, parents weigh in on the various struggles and joys of raising kids. Within: step parenting, custody battles, images of masculinity, navigating the autism spectrum, and so much more.

With words from Jonas (Cheer the Eff Up), Tomas Moniz (Rad Dad), Kelli Callis (That Girl), Rust Belt Jessie (Reckless Chants), Edward Jenkins Hernandez, Justin Birnholz, and Kristi Nommensen...[ continued ]

In What Are You Raising Them For?, Tim Devin looks at the counterculture shifts of the '60s and '70s and sees how it changed the way people parented their kids. Using '70s hippie literature and the experiences of adults raised in nontraditional settings as source material, Tim Devin examines where counterculture parenting ideas were coming from, how well they were working, and what we can take away from it all today...[ continued ]