Zines

Each issue of Behind the Zines is such a joy to read and warms my heart so much. Zine lifers, independent publishers, and artists of all stripes gather together to tell stories that never otherwise get told. (Like, in this issue, Todd Taylor of Razorcake's journey into a warehouse postal audit with rejected snake meat and live chickens.)

This issue's highlight: an essay from our own Gina Sarti about the ten-year anniversary of her ridiculously popular zine Shit's Fucked: A Positivity Guide. It's the rare story of making tons of lovely connections by way of a small zine that randomly went viral on Reddit a decade ago and never stopped.

Close-second highlight: Jonathan Valelly's deep-dive into the Broken Pencil Zine Awards—a massive, wonderful operation (that old-school zinesters love to hate on).

There's also: zine tattoos, first-time zinesters, postal bliss, experimental hip-hop collective zines, the pandemic zine fest scene, the most unwanted zine, anarchist zine printing, retro zine reviews, and an interview with Jolie Ruin (of The Escapist Artist).

32 pages, half-letter size. 

 

A pandemic short story about a lonely science teacher adopting stray animals, having distanced hook-ups, drinking beers in the park, watching planets align. As always with Tomas Moniz, it's a pleasure to read and finds a sweet, unexpected depth. 

32 pages, half-letter size.

This issue of Caboose considers the ways we connect. From pandemic depths, Liz Mason looks at virtual dance parties, advancements in karaoke technology, digitizing her old college radio show archives, her grade school media empire, wormholes, and much more.

48 pages, half-letter size.

The quarantine issue of everyone's favorite cat zine, Cat Party! Comics, illustrations, and essays about cat friends and being at home.

Art and words from Jay McQuirns, Christa Dippel, Missy Kulik, Vanessa Berry, Jackie Soro, Joseph Carlough, Keiko Ishibashi, and Helen Kaucher.

32 pages, half-letter size.

In this, the "pre-pandemic naivete" issue, we get comics about parenting, reading while walking, and explaining second-wave ska to children. Gorgeously printed.

40 pages, quarter-size, risograph printed.

In the "obligatory coronavirus" issue, we get comics about the pandemic. Life as a high school art teacher, worries, hobbies, boredom, so many questions.

40 pages, quarter-size, risograph printed.

We're offering free zine packs to those who are struggling financially or emotionally right now. We're in the middle of a revolution in the middle of a pandemic and, given the state of things, it's not much. But hopefully it can be something to help, in a small way, get you (or someone you know) through.

Just like with our zine care packages at the beginning of COVID-19, we won't ask what you're dealing with and you don't need to provide any details. 

Simply CONTACT US and say "hey, I'd love a zine care package," list some subjects you're interested in, provide your mailing address, and we'll send something your way.

[Due to postage costs, and our own precarious financial situation, we can only offer this to folks in the U.S.]

Good Night People of Earth is Moe Bowstern's daily digest zine, cataloging the months at the beginning of the pandemic. Stolen cars, giant communal grocery runs, John Prine tributes, rants worth ranting, songs to sing, COVID bingo, so much more.

Plus still relevant ideas like: "Day 12...how I visit my friends in the neighborhood, by having my co-isolationist photograph me in front of my friends' homes, and then texting a photo and saying hi and I love you. Most stalkery thing ever, and yet no complaints, more evidence of the flux that shared social understanding is currently in."

Highlight: "How to Shelter Alone as if You Live in a Group House." Priceless.

56 pages, half-letter size.

The sequel to Aj Michel's COVID t-shirt zine project, I've Worn All the Shirts in the DrawerGot a Box Full of T-Shirts is another charming daily project in an effort to stay sane through a global pandemic.

This time Aj digs through the box of shirts that were slated to become a quilt, or be donated, and wore one each to try to understand why these shirts had been relegated to the box to begin with. What emerges is a nice peek into '80s and '90s punk and indie rock, 2000s comic culture, underground movies, and more. 

20 pages, quarter-size.

A deep-dive into the animated television show BoJack Horseman, by way of personal essays, comics, tarot, and interviews.

Within: alcoholism, international fandom, the history of screwball comedies, unlikeable cartoon women, absurdism, representation in voice acting, the power of Lisa Hanawalt, and much more. For fans, as well as those who can't understand what there is to love in a cartoon about addiction and depression. 

With words from: Joshua James Amberson, Timothy Day, Jessica Fonvergne, Lauren Hobson, Tessa Livingstone, M.L. Schepps, Jourdain Searles, and Molly E. Simas. Plus an interview with Leca from BoJack Hidden Jokes

Illustrations from: Eileen Chavez, Ross Jackson, Naomi Marshall, and Liz Yerby. Cover and back cover art by Sarah Mirk. 

Winner of the Broken Pencil Best Fanzine of 2020 award. All proceeds from the zine benefit Black Resilience Fund and the National Lawyers Guild.

Printed by Eberhardt Press. 68 pages, half-letter size.