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Zines

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more...[ continued ]

Last copy! Part music magazine, part art zine, and part literary journal, Antsy is a notably pleasurable combination of things brought to you by a star-studded cast. Within: editor Dustin Krcatovich interviews street-performer legend The Space Lady and experimental filmmaker Ben Russell. Pop songwriting genius Fred Thomas interviews ambient musician Dominic Coppola. Forest Juziuk brings us into the making of the classic surf-rock novelty record The Ventures in Space...[ continued ]

The first issue of Fred Thomas' Balcony, a highly enjoyable take on the now-rare music-focused variety zine. Balcony is a joy. The brilliant opening essay (on the naming of zines and bands and season three of Jersey Shore) brought me back to a golden era of zines that I often long for, and the rest of the zine stays on this bright path with a short history of post-punk, a list, and an interview with sound artist Andrea Pensado...[ continued ]

In this issue of Balcony there's a public apology, an essay about Lewis Hyde's The Gift, an interview with left-field hip-hop musician Sterling Toles, in-depth record reviews, and a couple poems by Charles Gonsalves. But as in every issue of Balcony, it's also much more than that. A surprising, quietly exceptional zine.

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

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"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management...[ continued ]

This issue of the long-running Basic Paper Airplane zine series focuses on interviews—what it means to create that space and all the ways they can succeed or fail. Ten interviews with writers, artists, and musicians that delve into the creative process, identity, family, image, myth, and obsession.

Interviews with: musician Owen Ashworth (Advance Base/Casiotone for the Painfully Alone), essayist Elena Passarello (Animals Strike Curious Poses), poet Casey Fuller (A Fort Made of Doors), musician Erika M...[ continued ]

One of our favorite Seattle zines is back with tales from the record store counter, long walks in various locales, dangerous doppelgängers, and 8-track tapes. 

As Clock Tower Nine ringleader Danny Noonan describes it in the introduction: "This fanzine is like a bunch of people sitting around a fire in late fall, all taking turns telling a story."

24 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

How does Cometbus, after 38 years as a zine, just get better and better? It's a mystery, but it does. Issue 59 is a deep dive into both death and longevity in the underground. In short: what does sustainability look like in counterculture? This question takes Aaron on a journey from the Epitaph Records and Thrasher magazine offices to hanging out at a punk-owned vegan donut shop and a tamale stand at the farmer's market with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile and Sex Stains fame)...[ continued ]

After a long absence, the second edition of Chase Kamp's The Complete Speculative Red Hot Chili Peppers Fan Fiction is finally here. TCSRHCPFF is a gloriously odd collection of interlinked short stories based on the lives and careers of past and present members of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Within: "Red Hot Chili Parents," "Rick Rubin's Mansion," and "Retired Hot Chili Peppers," culminating at the end into something truly unexpected...[ continued ]

A highly enjoyable series of comics adapted from music biographies. Within: Bob Dylan's makeshift Blood on the Tracks backing band, Kurt & Courtney's mac-and-cheese trials, John & Yoko's primal scream therapy, John Coltrane being a good guy, Mike Watt wearing a pumpkin on his head, the feuds of J Mascis & Lou Barlow, and Kristin Hersh's evil self.

40 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]