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Zines

"Zach Ellis’s debut, Being, is a remarkable, lyrical memoir that works to put into words what it is to be transgender. It’s a book about relationships, about growing up, about the body and mind, about desire, about parenting, about how we adjust to huge changes, and about whom we know ourselves to be. It’s a funny book, an honest book, and a book that cuts deep into you."

Originally released through Future Tense Books' Instant Future series...[ continued ]

In Better Feminism Workbook: Discussion Questions on Gender Dynamics, Internalized Sexism, and Emotional Labor, Jennifer Williams lays out a series of questions to help people of all genders dig deeper into their intentions, assumptions, and relationship patterns. A simple, one-of-a-kind workbook zine that can be used for both solo writing exercises and as prompts for discussion groups...[ continued ]

From Seattle comic artist Sydney Chavan, Bod is a short dive into body image, media messages about women's weight, and personal comfort and health. Smart, honest, playful and serious at once, briefly cosmic.

Color cover, B&W inside. 16 pages, cut half-legal size. 

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A primer on how not to be a dick. Don't Be a Dick! serves as an introductory guide to understanding consent, toxic masculinity, rape culture, the porn industry, and more. Well-written and accessible.

36 pages, half-letter size, revised edition, cover colors vary.

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A great issue of Doris. Thinking about what it means to both have close friends and be part of a community. Gratitude for the life lessons Mom taught. A conversation with imprisoned environmental activist Marius Mason. And the first interview in Cindy Crabb's "Anarchists Over 40" series, with Portland's own Icky Dunn of the Justseeds Arts Collective.

48 pages, oblong quarter-size...[ continued ]

Temporary sale! In her short illustrated essay A Few Good Boys, M. Sabine Rear writes about growing up surrounded by art from straight white men and the hoops she had to go through to relate to it. She also writes about the men she holds onto, and her dread that they might one day be revealed as monsters.

16 pages, quarter-size.

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A charming little zine about being inspired by David Bowie over the course of many years. First memories, hidden records, gender presentation, making friends with one of Bowie's friends.

24 pages, cut quarter-size.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to...[ continued ]

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines...[ continued ]

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more...[ continued ]