Zines

In Better Feminism Workbook: Discussion Questions on Gender Dynamics, Internalized Sexism, and Emotional Labor, Jennifer Williams lays out a series of questions to help people of all genders dig deeper into their intentions, assumptions, and relationship patterns. A simple, one-of-a-kind workbook zine that can be used for both solo writing exercises and as prompts for discussion groups.

Part of the zine's profits benefit St. James Infirmary in San Francisco, a peer-based occupational health and safety clinic for sex workers and their families. 

44 pages, half-letter size.

From Seattle comic artist Sydney Chavan, Bod is a short dive into body image, media messages about women's weight, and personal comfort and health. Smart, honest, playful and serious at once, briefly cosmic.

Color cover, B&W inside. 16 pages, cut half-legal size. 

A primer on how not to be a dick. Don't Be a Dick! serves as an introductory guide to understanding consent, toxic masculinity, rape culture, the porn industry, and more. Well-written and accessible.

36 pages, half-letter size, revised edition, cover colors vary.

In a series of interviews with queer women and non-binary folks, Fear, Safety, & Femmes examines what safety looks like. What places and people create a sense of safety? Which qualities in people create a sense of danger? What self-defense tools and techniques do people use to feel safer?

20 pages, cut half-letter size.

Temporary sale! In her short illustrated essay A Few Good Boys, M. Sabine Rear writes about growing up surrounded by art from straight white men and the hoops she had to go through to relate to it. She also writes about the men she holds onto, and her dread that they might one day be revealed as monsters.

16 pages, quarter-size.

A history of pre-Roe v Wade America, underground abortion services, and the pro-choice movement. Packed with stories of incredible women who took matters into their own hands.

24 pages, A5 size.

Keesha and Joanie and Jane is a fictional story where, in a not-too-distant future, abortion is made illegal in the United States. Young women inspired by the work of Jane, the Chicago pre-Roe v Wade underground abortion service, get a grant to bring the original "Janes" to town to speak at their school as an excuse to talk out how to make their own underground abortion service.

Written by Portland author Judith Arcana —one of the original Janes —and brilliantly formatted like a Broadway Playbill by Eberhardt Press. The story is followed by an excellent Q+A with author Judith Arcana at the end of the chapbook.

64 pages, A5 size, full color.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to.

In large part, Mapping Out Utopia challenges the idea that the 1970s were when the ideals of the '60s burned out. While it may have looked like that on the surface, it's clear that many people saw this decade as a time to put the ideals into action. And these collectives, political organizations, alternative schools, feminist organizations, bookstores, and clinics are proof.

80 pages, half-letter size.

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines. Each volume maps out a different part of the city. This one takes a stab at the heart of the region: Boston. This volume offers overviews of almost 200 organizations, eleven hand-drawn maps, and a number of in-depth overviews on topics including gay liberation, black separatism, and church basements as countercultural command centers. From Operation Black to the Recycling Revolutionary Coop, it's all in here."

108 pages, 26 illustrations, 11 maps. Green cardstock cover, with off-white interior pages. Half-letter size, stapled wraps.

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more.

80 pages, half-letter size.