Zines

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes. "Everything is at stake, but we have everything to gain by trying."

40 pages, half-letter size. 

A primer on how not to be a dick. Don't Be a Dick! serves as an introductory guide to understanding consent, toxic masculinity, rape culture, the porn industry, and more. Well-written and accessible.

36 pages, half-letter size, revised edition, cover colors vary.

A great issue of Doris. Thinking about what it means to both have close friends and be part of a community. Gratitude for the life lessons Mom taught. A conversation with imprisoned environmental activist Marius Mason. And the first interview in Cindy Crabb's "Anarchists Over 40" series, with Portland's own Icky Dunn of the Justseeds Arts Collective.

48 pages, oblong quarter-size.

A history of pre-Roe v Wade America, underground abortion services, and the pro-choice movement. Packed with stories of incredible women who took matters into their own hands.

24 pages, A5 size.

A wonderful zine about gleaning, otherwise known as "harvesting surplus produce and giving it to people who otherwise might not have access to fresh fruit and veggies." But it's also so much more than that, as well: Glean Zine is a compact introduction to food waste the world over and how we can begin thinking differently about our food habits.

Gorgeous comics and illustrations from the one-and-only Nicki Sabalu (DIY or Don't We) throughout. (Plus charts and graphs and many other well-informed things.)

36 pages, cut half-letter size.

Know Your Vote, a workbook zine from Anna Jo Beck, seeks to help you make sense of the United States voting system and political structures. Prompting you to figure out your state's elections, representatives, and local government, this zine is a much-needed guide for anyone left confused by the (often ridiculously complex) American systems of democracy. 

From Beck's Biff Boff Bam Sock zine series. 24 pages, half-letter size.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to.

In large part, Mapping Out Utopia challenges the idea that the 1970s were when the ideals of the '60s burned out. While it may have looked like that on the surface, it's clear that many people saw this decade as a time to put the ideals into action. And these collectives, political organizations, alternative schools, feminist organizations, bookstores, and clinics are proof.

80 pages, half-letter size.

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines. Each volume maps out a different part of the city. This one takes a stab at the heart of the region: Boston. This volume offers overviews of almost 200 organizations, eleven hand-drawn maps, and a number of in-depth overviews on topics including gay liberation, black separatism, and church basements as countercultural command centers. From Operation Black to the Recycling Revolutionary Coop, it's all in here."

108 pages, 26 illustrations, 11 maps. Green cardstock cover, with off-white interior pages. Half-letter size, stapled wraps.

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more.

80 pages, half-letter size.

Last copy! ​​​​​​​The newest zine from Nomadic Youth, a London-based DIY youth project that provides free pop-up activities to teenagers across the city and supports youth activism and mutual aid. This small art zine celebrates Pride and the Black Lives Matter movement with 11 pieces of art by young people of color and/or young people who are LGBT+. 

20 pages, full-color, quarter-size. Comes with free sticker.