Zines

Under the banner of "lost and found," this issue of the Cat Party zine has comics, essays, and illustrations from Rebecca Bayuk, Kelsey Stewart, Dino Caruso, Marylyn Martin-Weatherly, Adam Wollett, Joseph Carlough, and Eden Shale.

32 pages, half-letter size.

The quarantine issue of everyone's favorite cat zine, Cat Party! Comics, illustrations, and essays about cat friends and being at home.

Art and words from Jay McQuirns, Christa Dippel, Missy Kulik, Vanessa Berry, Jackie Soro, Joseph Carlough, Keiko Ishibashi, and Helen Kaucher.

32 pages, half-letter size.

Last two copies! Clock Tower Nine has become one of my new favorite zines. Using a variety-format approach reminiscent of classic '90s zines, Danny Noonan puts together a consistently interesting assortment. Letters, postcards, and the stories of others mix with personal narratives, odd facts, and ephemera.

This issue largely consists of a story about being a roadie for a band, an intercontinental fast friendship through postcards and drunk dials, and a barely-planned cross-country road trip.

32 pages, half-letter size. Color cover, B&W inside.

Last two copies! In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most. 

Clock Tower Nine contributors from Seattle, Tukwila, Minneapolis, and Cleveland weigh in on a range of topics including: 8-track tapes, lonely videogames, losing battles on the bus, The Zombies, the Ultimate Warrior, struggling with religion after a horrible accident, and more.

36 pages, blue and teal risograph-printed cover.

One of our favorite Seattle zines is back with tales from the record store counter, long walks in various locales, dangerous doppelgängers, and 8-track tapes. 

As Clock Tower Nine ringleader Danny Noonan describes it in the introduction: "This fanzine is like a bunch of people sitting around a fire in late fall, all taking turns telling a story."

24 pages, half-letter size.

Cometbus #55 could be looked at two ways: A treatise on growing up without giving up, or proof that even the most dedicated proponent of youth culture grows old. Either way, it’s fascinating. It’s coming from a life in punk, leftist politics, and DIY culture, but you don’t need to be interested in any of that to be interested in the stories he tells.

72 pages, half-letter size.

With the hyperbolic zeal and rancor of a true bookseller, Aaron Cometbus brings to life his chosen family: the booksellers of New York City. A Bestiary of Booksellers is for anyone who has sold books long enough to have it seep into their identity, but it’s also for all manner of book addicts, subculture scholars, obsessives, and night owls.

112 pages, half-letter size, perfect-bound.

In this, the 35-year anniversary issue of Cometbus, Aaron interviews cartoonists. Made for both the diehards and those generally wary of comics, the zine is a dive into New York comic culture—from those in the spotlight to those lighting the world behind the scenes.

Interviews with Gabrielle Bell, Robin Enrico, Jeffrey Lewis, Julia Wertz, Bill Kartalopoulos, Gary Panter, Adrian Tomine, Ben Katchor, Paul Levitz, Drew Friedman, Karen Green, Gabe Fowler, Kim Deitch, and Al Jaffee. With contributing interviewers Zak Sally and Charle Brownstein.

100 pages, half-letter size, perfect-bound. Cover art by Jeffrey Lewis, cartoonist portraits by Nate Powell.

Addicting and perfectly bizarre, Cometbus #58 is a story about finding home in a greasy-spoon diner full of combative old-timers. It's a ride full of strangeness and surprises.

44 pages, half-letter size.

How does Cometbus, after 38 years as a zine, just get better and better? It's a mystery, but it does. Issue 59 is a deep dive into both death and longevity in the underground. In short: what does sustainability look like in counterculture? This question takes Aaron on a journey from the Epitaph Records and Thrasher magazine offices to hanging out at a punk-owned vegan donut shop and a tamale stand at the farmer's market with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile and Sex Stains fame). It's thought-provoking, fun, open, honest, and just the right amount of curmudgeonly.

As Aaron writes: "The question was, could you establish yourself without becoming the establishment? Because that was the goal, as far as I was concerned: to build institutions that served our needs, and helped produce and distribute the art we created. To make spaces where we could express ourselves, like clubs and cafes—and magazines, which were gathering places as well. I was sick to death of all the noble failures. Instead of mourning our losses, I wanted to look at projects that had lasted."

140 pages, perfect-bound.