Tim Devin

In What Are You Raising Them For?, Tim Devin looks at the counterculture shifts of the '60s and '70s and sees how it changed the way people parented their kids. Using '70s hippie literature and the experiences of adults raised in nontraditional settings as source material, Tim Devin examines where counterculture parenting ideas were coming from, how well they were working, and what we can take away from it all today.

Even-handed and curious, What Are You Raising Them For? is a great read cover to cover. One of my favorite zines of the year.

64 pages, half-letter size.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to.

In large part, Mapping Out Utopia challenges the idea that the 1970s were when the ideals of the '60s burned out. While it may have looked like that on the surface, it's clear that many people saw this decade as a time to put the ideals into action. And these collectives, political organizations, alternative schools, feminist organizations, bookstores, and clinics are proof.

80 pages, half-letter size.

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines. Each volume maps out a different part of the city. This one takes a stab at the heart of the region: Boston. This volume offers overviews of almost 200 organizations, eleven hand-drawn maps, and a number of in-depth overviews on topics including gay liberation, black separatism, and church basements as countercultural command centers. From Operation Black to the Recycling Revolutionary Coop, it's all in here."

108 pages, 26 illustrations, 11 maps. Green cardstock cover, with off-white interior pages. Half-letter size, stapled wraps.

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more.

80 pages, half-letter size.