Zines

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes. "Everything is at stake, but we have everything to gain by trying."

40 pages, half-letter size. 

A love letter to movie theater concession stands, Happy Meal toys, the meats of Memory Lane, the Girl Scout cookies of 1981. Cul-De-Sac #9 is all about the joys and pains, hilarity and heartache of loving food.

44 pages, half-letter size.

Farm & Wilderness Report Zine #1 focuses on the entwined histories of Total Loss Farm and Montague Farm as part of a deep dive into the communal farm movement and underground press movement of the 1960s and early '70s.

This zine revises and combines the information from the first and second Farm & Wilderness Report zines, while also kicking off a new zine series. 

48 pages, half-letter size.

A wonderful zine about gleaning, otherwise known as "harvesting surplus produce and giving it to people who otherwise might not have access to fresh fruit and veggies." But it's also so much more than that, as well: Glean Zine is a compact introduction to food waste the world over and how we can begin thinking differently about our food habits.

Gorgeous comics and illustrations from the one-and-only Nicki Sabalu (DIY or Don't We) throughout. (Plus charts and graphs and many other well-informed things.)

36 pages, cut half-letter size.

Every issue of the My Complicated Relationship With Food zine series is impossibly good. These "reviews of some of the things we put in our mouths" are surprising and bizarre and, after years of between-issue waiting, Volume Four is finally here and well worth the wait.

Within: getting drunk off mouthwash, potato appreciation, trying to define what a sandwich actually is, the case against gelato, and so much more. It's the anti-foodie zine that's loved by foodies.

20 pages, quarter-size.

The bludgeoning powers of pineapples, the lie of Florida orange juice, the joys of drinking applesauce from the jar, and why fancy ice cream is just a pathetic search for meaning.

Great for coffee tables, as small gifts, and reading aloud to friends.

20 pages, quarter-size.

In Otherwise, their sequel to the excellent All Together workbook zine, Emma Percy guides us through better understanding and connecting to the world around us. Through questions, exercises, quotes, and research, Otherwise explores "ecological identity, climate grief + anger, the precarity + necessity of hope, and sparking creative resistance to the genocidal + ecocidal capitalist system."

44 pages, half-letter size. 

Within: Herbs and flowers to save the bees, ice-cube tray recipes, backyard boredom busters for those long summer days, and so much more.

Perhaps the best thing about Radical Domesticity is that it's not only super fun and helpful, but it also addresses communal living and gives ways to conceptualize living with other people. Essential tips you don't often see in other zines.

16 pages, half-letter size.

This issue of Radical Domesticity is preparation for the fall and winter months. A guide to deciduous leaves, DIY bird feeders and seed, recipes for hot beverages and warming foods, how to keep a cold at bay.

Emma's brilliant introduction responds to the idea that maintaining a home is somehow not radical or feminist. Everything she has to say is so wise! Best line: "A chore wheel is not the beginning of a police state."

16 pages, half-letter size.

Radical Domesticity always has the best, most practical advice. Within: how to be a good host, how to wash your clothes so they last and last, how to remove even the toughest stains, how to store food, making a storage system out of milk crates, and much more. And her advice on how to be a better guest? Crucial! At any age.

16 pages, half-letter size.