Zines

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes. "Everything is at stake, but we have everything to gain by trying."

40 pages, half-letter size. 

A love letter to movie theater concession stands, Happy Meal toys, the meats of Memory Lane, the Girl Scout cookies of 1981. Cul-De-Sac #9 is all about the joys and pains, hilarity and heartache of loving food.

44 pages, half-letter size.

Every issue of the My Complicated Relationship With Food zine series is impossibly good. These "reviews of some of the things we put in our mouths" are surprising and bizarre and, after years of between-issue waiting, Volume Four is finally here and well worth the wait.

Within: getting drunk off mouthwash, potato appreciation, trying to define what a sandwich actually is, the case against gelato, and so much more. It's the anti-foodie zine that's loved by foodies.

20 pages, quarter-size.

The bludgeoning powers of pineapples, the lie of Florida orange juice, the joys of drinking applesauce from the jar, and why fancy ice cream is just a pathetic search for meaning.

Great for coffee tables, as small gifts, and reading aloud to friends.

20 pages, quarter-size.

In Otherwise, their sequel to the excellent All Together workbook zine, Emma Percy guides us through better understanding and connecting to the world around us. Through questions, exercises, quotes, and research, Otherwise explores "ecological identity, climate grief + anger, the precarity + necessity of hope, and sparking creative resistance to the genocidal + ecocidal capitalist system."

44 pages, half-letter size. 

Within: Herbs and flowers to save the bees, ice-cube tray recipes, backyard boredom busters for those long summer days, and so much more.

Perhaps the best thing about Radical Domesticity is that it's not only super fun and helpful, but it also addresses communal living and gives ways to conceptualize living with other people. Essential tips you don't often see in other zines.

16 pages, half-letter size.

This issue of Radical Domesticity is preparation for the fall and winter months. A guide to deciduous leaves, DIY bird feeders and seed, recipes for hot beverages and warming foods, how to keep a cold at bay.

Emma's brilliant introduction responds to the idea that maintaining a home is somehow not radical or feminist. Everything she has to say is so wise! Best line: "A chore wheel is not the beginning of a police state."

16 pages, half-letter size.

Radical Domesticity always has the best, most practical advice. Within: how to be a good host, how to wash your clothes so they last and last, how to remove even the toughest stains, how to store food, making a storage system out of milk crates, and much more. And her advice on how to be a better guest? Crucial! At any age.

16 pages, half-letter size.

Rachel Lee-Carman's zines are, to me, the perfect manifestation of the potential inherent in zines. What can zines do that a mass-published book can't? Well, they can (like in this issue of The Thread) have pages you take out and fold to create mini zines within the larger zine. They can have a sheet of velum paper for you to write on and send to her to be part of a different zine. They can be full of sketchbook drawings and scrapbook photos, can break up stories in odd in interesting ways, have detailed (almost circular) instructions for making twine out of stinging nettles in the middle of the some really heartfelt writing. They can be wilder and freer and full of a raw life that gets edited out of 99% of books.

This issue of The Thread is an anniversary, of sorts. The 17th issue of a zine series Rachel Lee-Carman started 17 years ago when she was 17. It has meditations on keeping a journal, romantic friendships, the beauty and danger of rivers over the course of a lifetime, an imagined art show, three years of grieving a parent in a personal and atypical way, Pagan customs, food and poem pairings with Anis Mojgani, so much more.

40 pages, half-letter size.

This issue of We'll Never Have Paris, the literary zine of all things never meant to be, focuses on food. Within, there are personal essays about diets, the melting pot of culinary cultures in a textiles factory, an immigrant family's relationship to Filet-O-Fish, a French mother's relationship to endives, the morning of Freddy Mercury's death, a failed care package, and more. 

With work from: Diane Englert, Melissa Hung, Mollia Jensen, Ed Kemp, Gina Kropf, Charles Reaves, Dani Scoville, Christine Shaffer, and Zou Zou Stasko​.

44 pages, quarter-size.