Zines

"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management...[ continued ]

The best zine about zines around. Within: Sarah Mirk's joy-inducing stories about her Year of Zines project. Corinne Halbert's "Zany Zinetiquette" comics. Gianni Simone's stories of how his early 2000s zines led to becoming a freelance writer in Japan. Ed Kemp and Mark Cunning's home copier treatises. Todd Taylor's personal history of Razorcake frugality. Liz Mason's hilarious Quimby's "Zine Data Mining...[ continued ]

An exploration of the body, one part at a time, by Tomas Moniz. Written as poems, but reading more like vignettes or small essays about how complicated it is just to exist in your own frame. These pieces are sweet, emotionally heavy, sexy, and sometimes really funny. They are so honest that it leaves you wishing for that same openness in yourself, to be so unashamed of what we carry around and what we desire...[ continued ]

A highly enjoyable series of comics adapted from music biographies. Within: Bob Dylan's makeshift Blood on the Tracks backing band, Kurt & Courtney's mac-and-cheese trials, John & Yoko's primal scream therapy, John Coltrane being a good guy, Mike Watt wearing a pumpkin on his head, the feuds of J Mascis & Lou Barlow, and Kristin Hersh's evil self.

40 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

Since 1991, Fluke has been creating great variety zines covering all realms of punk and underground culture. This new issue is particularly PACKED with goodness. Interviews with graphic novelist Nate Powell (March, Any Empire, Swallow Me Whole), mural artist Danny Martin, and skateboard magazine historian Kevin Marks (Look Back Library). Personal histories on Maximum Rocknroll, R...[ continued ]

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys...[ continued ]

A wonderful new zine about gleaning, otherwise known as "harvesting surplus produce and giving it to people who otherwise might not have access to fresh fruit and veggies." But it's also so much more than that, as well: Glean Zine is a compact introduction to food waste the world over and how we can begin thinking differently about our food habits.

Gorgeous comics and illustrations from the one-and-only Nicki Sabalu (DIY or Don't We) throughout...[ continued ]

Last copy! In The Hid Are Out, Noah D. writes about growing up in Dayton, Ohio in the '90s and discovering fellow Dayton natives The Breeders. Told through short personal stories, the zine is a heartfelt tribute to the band and an example of how music can change the course of a person's life.

24 pages, quarter-size.

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This DIY punk venue history is more than just an archive of the 21st-century Boston punk scene (though it is, very much, that), but also a brief history of DIY venues in general. Tracking the beginnings of the anti-corporate punk spirit of the late '70s and early '80s, to the "no stage" ethos of the early '90s, to the house show culture of the 2000s, this zine is for anyone interested in DIY culture...[ continued ]

A deep-dive into the animated television show BoJack Horseman, by way of personal essays, comics, tarot, and interviews.

Within: alcoholism, international fandom, the history of screwball comedies, unlikeable cartoon women, absurdism, representation in voice acting, the power of Lisa Hanawalt, and much more. For fans, as well as those who can't understand what there is to love in a cartoon about addiction and depression...[ continued ]