Zines

"A funny thing about regret is that it's better to regret something you have done than to regret something you haven't done." So begins the third issue of Balcony, the publishing outlet of musician Fred Thomas (Saturday Looks Good to Me, City Center).

Interviews with long-running New Zealand experimental rock band The Dead C, cultish songwriter Edith Frost, and ambient musician John Daniel of Forest Management. Plus a piece about names from Marcy Donelson. 

32 pages, half-letter size.

 

The best zine about zines around. Within: Sarah Mirk's joy-inducing stories about her Year of Zines project. Corinne Halbert's "Zany Zinetiquette" comics. Gianni Simone's stories of how his early 2000s zines led to becoming a freelance writer in Japan. Ed Kemp and Mark Cunning's home copier treatises. Todd Taylor's personal history of Razorcake frugality. Liz Mason's hilarious Quimby's "Zine Data Mining." Brian Polk's brilliant imagined zines.

Not to mention words and pictures from zine superstars like: Anna Jo Beck, Nyx, Jenna Freedman, Mike Faloon, Johnnie B. Baker, and Ed Tillman.

Cover art by Sarah Mirk. 40 pages, half-letter size.

Each issue of Behind the Zines is such a joy to read and warms my heart so much. Zine lifers, independent publishers, and artists of all stripes gather together to tell stories that never otherwise get told. (Like, in this issue, Todd Taylor of Razorcake's journey into a warehouse postal audit with rejected snake meat and live chickens.)

This issue's highlight: an essay from our own Gina Sarti about the ten-year anniversary of her ridiculously popular zine Shit's Fucked: A Positivity Guide. It's the rare story of making tons of lovely connections by way of a small zine that randomly went viral on Reddit a decade ago and never stopped.

Close-second highlight: Jonathan Valelly's deep-dive into the Broken Pencil Zine Awards—a massive, wonderful operation (that old-school zinesters love to hate on).

There's also: zine tattoos, first-time zinesters, postal bliss, experimental hip-hop collective zines, the pandemic zine fest scene, the most unwanted zine, anarchist zine printing, retro zine reviews, and an interview with Jolie Ruin (of The Escapist Artist).

32 pages, half-letter size. 

 

An exploration of the body, one part at a time, by Tomas Moniz. Written as poems, but reading more like vignettes or small essays about how complicated it is just to exist in your own frame. These pieces are sweet, emotionally heavy, sexy, and sometimes really funny. They are so honest that it leaves you wishing for that same openness in yourself, to be so unashamed of what we carry around and what we desire.

Illustrated by Portland's own Amanda Englund. Reprinted through 1984 Printing. 40 pages, quarter-size.

Comic artist Jason Martin's Covers has long been one of our favorites and we're so thrilled about this long-awaited second issue. These "covers album"-style comic adaptations of his favorite stories about musicians are just a joy. 

In this issue: Sonic Youth's trailer of stolen gear, Keanu Reeves' ice skating rink 30th birthday party with Thurston Moore and Mike Watt, Alex Zhang Hungtai of Dirty Beaches' getting banned from the U.S., Juliana Hatfield's sold guitar, Jim O'Rourke's stuffed animals of protection, and Neil Young's brief imagined life as a salmon.

36 pages, half-letter size.

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys. A fascinating in-depth interview with graffiti historian Susan A. Phillips (The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles GraffitiWallbangin'). Linda Kite on her life with D Boon of Minutemen and seeing the '80s L.A. punk scene as conceptual art. Sergej Vutuc's dream-like skateboarding photography. Gary Floyd (of Dicks and Sister Double Happiness) on being a gay Texan punk in the 1970s and touring with Nirvana the year Nevermind broke. And legendary train-graffiti artist buZ blurr (AKA- Colossus of Roads) at the center of everything, holding everyone together. 

56 pages, cut half-letter size.

Songwriter and poet Sara Renberg begins her zine series looking at the often-maligned solo career of former Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus. Focusing on his 2001 solo debut (before officially becoming Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks), she takes us on a joyous song-by-song investigation of why people hate it and how much there is to love. It's a fun read, even if you don't know the album. Along the way, there's the end of Pavement, the making of Silver Jews' American Water, and life in Portland, Oregon.

The zine is also a personal journey of a rural kid in the big city, discovering indie music, coming out, and dating girls for the first time (all to the soundtrack of this album).

32 pages, half-letter size.

Shit's Fucked, Still is the long-awaited follow-up to our own Gina Sarti's tiny bestselling zine of useful suggestions for getting through tough times. And would you believe: it's even better than the first! Sweet, personal, practical, fun, and down to earth. 

Within: bad mood bag, home museum, floating flowers, magical Mondays, bathroom poems, comfort potatoes, and so much more.

20 pages, stapled wraps, quarter-size/pamphlet size (4.25" x 5.5", 108 mm x 140 mm).

A highly recommended interview issue from this long-running Vancouver, B.C. punk zine. Community organizing, the perspective and challenges of being a DIY lifer, real-life sailing epics. Aaron Cometbus, Shellshag, Matt Hern, and more.
60 pages, half-letter size.

In this issue of Somnambulist, Martha Grover publishes her mom Frani's letters to Portland mayor Ted Wheeler regarding Portland's housing crisis. This far-reaching collection of letters brings in personal, literary, and historical viewpoints. Largely, she writes from her perspective as a long-time advocate for houseless communities. She talks about the friends she's made in these communities over the years and the challenges these friends have faced, trying to get through to the mayor. 

Ten percent of all proceeds go to my Frani’s charity East County Aid and Comfort. 40 pages, half-letter size.