Recently Restocked

6 vintage cassettes from our extensive collection. All in great condition, all previewed to make sure they play well. 

Each grab bag comes with a wide variety of genres and time periods. From '60s & '70s soul to '90s indie & alternative, '80s new wave to '90s R&B. Novelties and oddities, '50s rhythm and blues, lost classics, old-school hip-hop, and everything in between. 

A great deal for the adventurous listener.

Looking exactly like a zine you might pick up at a punk show in the mid-'90s, Hit the Decks is a whole lot of fun. There's Katie Haegele's partial tribute to Headbanger's Ball, a discussion about mixtapes by Sommer from the Mixtape Museum, and a casual stroll through VHS collecting by Joshua James Amberson.

There's interviews with Murder City Devils frontman Spencer Moody, whiskey folk hero lauren.napier, and Dead Milkmen co-founder Joe Jack Talcum.

There's comics from Jay McQuirns, collage art from lauren.napier, a new painted illustration from Spencer Moody, intimacy from little stray & LJ Brubaker, Neal Langford's lo-fi photography, a page of recipes from Joe Jack Talcum, a photo essay by Jess Moncrief about seeing Lee Ving perform in a tattoo shop, and Craig Wenner on how to put on a DIY show.

30 pages, full magazine-size.

At this point, this is a classic of the modern zine canon. Building is a cleanly laid out, accessible guide to making DIY events happen. Perfect for those just getting into organizing DIY events and with reminders and ideas that even the seasoned organizer can benefit from. A strong focus on house shows and radical communities, but a lot of ideas that can function in a lot of DIY event situations.

Put together by Neil Campau (of Electrician and World History) and edited by a ton of really great folks—Fred Thomas, Zoe Boekbinder, CJ Boyd, Danah Olivetree, Dustin Krcatovich, and Jamie Menzel, just to name a few.

Published by DoDiy.org. 44 pages, half-letter size.

A hand-printed graph paper pad for when inspiration strikes.

Offset print and made with 100% recycled materials. Spiral-bound, 9.5" x 6", 10 squares per inch, 120 sheets.

Rachel Lee-Carman's zines are, to me, the perfect manifestation of the potential inherent in zines. What can zines do that a mass-published book can't? Well, they can (like in this issue of The Thread) have pages you take out and fold to create mini zines within the larger zine. They can have a sheet of velum paper for you to write on and send to her to be part of a different zine. They can be full of sketchbook drawings and scrapbook photos, can break up stories in odd in interesting ways, have detailed (almost circular) instructions for making twine out of stinging nettles in the middle of the some really heartfelt writing. They can be wilder and freer and full of a raw life that gets edited out of 99% of books.

This issue of The Thread is an anniversary, of sorts. The 17th issue of a zine series Rachel Lee-Carman started 17 years ago when she was 17. It has meditations on keeping a journal, romantic friendships, the beauty and danger of rivers over the course of a lifetime, an imagined art show, three years of grieving a parent in a personal and atypical way, Pagan customs, food and poem pairings with Anis Mojgani, so much more.

40 pages, half-letter size.

Good Night People of Earth is Moe Bowstern's daily digest zine, cataloging the months at the beginning of the pandemic. Stolen cars, giant communal grocery runs, John Prine tributes, rants worth ranting, songs to sing, COVID bingo, so much more.

Plus still relevant ideas like: "Day 12...how I visit my friends in the neighborhood, by having my co-isolationist photograph me in front of my friends' homes, and then texting a photo and saying hi and I love you. Most stalkery thing ever, and yet no complaints, more evidence of the flux that shared social understanding is currently in."

Highlight: "How to Shelter Alone as if You Live in a Group House." Priceless.

56 pages, half-letter size.

Compiling stories from over 25 contributors, this issue is about being a "greenhorn" (AKA: a newbie) to commercial fishing. A wide range of voices chime in on the hilarious and the painful tales from their first time out.

"Some stories are from toe-dippers, people who deckhanded one season and then hung a scale-speckled hat on a rusty nail in some wayside outhouse and never turned back. Others are long backward looks from fishing folk who barely bother to scrape the silver off their elbows." -Moe Bowstern, from the introduction.

160 pages, half-legal size.

In this issue, Emma reminds us that "taking care of yourself can take many forms." Within: giving yourself a manicure at home, tips on saving money and budgeting, having an emergency plan and first-aid basics, as well as how to care for cut flowers.

20 pages, half-letter size.

In How Are You?, Moe Bowstern reviews cancer. What comes out of these "reviews" is a tale of being changed—feeling different on a fundamental level and not being able to explain it to anyone. The zine is real, sad, hilarious, and wise as all hell. 

"One of the more exciting experiences we can have as human beings is almost dying," Moe writes. "Brushes with death don't need to be all that close to have a tremendous impact on our psyches, reminding us the close line we walk between the worlds at all times. A cancer diagnosis that comes somewhat out of the blue from a routine mammogram—perhaps the very first mammogram that one has in one's life—is a brush with death with no actual basis in a reality of death."

28 pages, half-letter size. Free to people experiencing cancer; contact us if you'd like one. 

A highly enjoyable series of comics adapted from music biographies. Within: Bob Dylan's makeshift Blood on the Tracks backing band, Kurt & Courtney's mac-and-cheese trials, John & Yoko's primal scream therapy, John Coltrane being a good guy, Mike Watt wearing a pumpkin on his head, the feuds of J Mascis & Lou Barlow, and Kristin Hersh's evil self.

40 pages, half-letter size.