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This zine is so crazy inspiring and in your face, I love it. There’s the Black Punk Zine That Never Happened, a history of Go-go music, a write up on Rupal and his Letting it All Hang Out book, an interview with Andrea Rhinestone Eagle (from Purple Rhinestone Eagle) and Portland Latino punks Magic Johnson, and an article about influencial DJ and writer Don Letts. Plus, the always awesome Chris Sutton (Hornet Leg, The Gossip, my old roommate) lends his broad musical and cultural knowledge to the table in an awesome essay about blackness and music, and Brontez Purnell (Gravy Train, The Younger Lovers) writes about why he will be a riot girl until the day he fucking dies...[ continued ]

This issue of Shotgun Seamstress focuses on visual artists. It’s a pretty interesting to see the black punk focus applied to people working outside of punk music. Included within: an interview with Afro-Punk director James Spooner, a write-up on the art of Adee Roberson, a letter to Vaginal Creme Davis, praises for performance artist Kalup Linzy, an interview with video performance artist Jacob Gardens, and a poem by Lenelle Moise...[ continued ]

Last one! Osa serves up a homage to ESG, defines punk and afro-punk, and does interviews with Marilyn of Aye Nako/Fleabag, DJ Soul Sister, and Kicktease. Kisha sets us straight about body hair, Sean Padilla educates us about Death (the early black punk band, not the 80’s speed metal one--written before A Band Called Death!), records and zines are well reviewed. A good read as always...[ continued ]

The (gasp!) LAST issue of Shotgun Seamstress is here and is so good. There is so much in here: interviews with Trash Kit, Ms. Jacci Gresham, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, and (the one-and-only) Poly Styrene of the X-Ray Spex before her death.

Plus a Manifesta excerpt from Cocoa Puss--the amazing former Tacoma, Wa-based zine, 80’s DC hardcore, a Camping comic, punk through the African diaspora, and more...[ continued ]

Upon moving to New Orleans in 2009, Osa Atoe started putting on shows under the project name No More Fiction that featured female and queer-fronted bands. This is the story of the No More Fiction show series, told through flyers and words. A lot of Northwest buddies are on the flyer front--Mega Bog, Broken Water, Margy Pepper, Hysterics, Kusikia, S.L.F.M., and many more. Great flyers, great stories...[ continued ]

In six issues, Shotgun Seamstress covered a lot of ground. Golnar Nikpour says it best in her introduction: "this is not (just) a personal zine, not (just) a music zine, not (just) a political zine, but rather an explosive combination of the best of all those DIY traditions."

Through essays, interviews, historical portraits of important artists and scenes, reviews, and so much more, Shotgun Seamstress paid tribute and gave a platform for, "Black feminists, artists, punks, queers, and musicians...[ continued ]