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Zines

This issue of 8-Track Mind comes after a ten year (!) hiatus and is by far one of the best zines I’ve read in a long time. No longer purely an 8-track fanzine, it is now a look at the future of paper media and analog technologies in the digital present.

Editor Russ Forster asks 14 people who have been creating for long enough to be considered legends (from filmmakers to authors, magazine publishers to members of punk bands) the simple question “zines vs...[ continued ]

8-Track Mind is back again and this time it has come to celebrate the analog resurgence. Wildly different pieces spanning a whole range of voices and opinions, with extra commentary from some legends of underground media and music. 8-Track Mind never fails to disappoint and has the ability to make you think about something as seemingly simple as music formats as something expansive, something that carries over into other aspects of life...[ continued ]

Issue five deals with the current state of the United States as seen from car windows mixes with historical oddities of Americana. Place and home (and the hula hoop in American history) considered through small vignettes.

20 pages, half-letter size, photographs throughout.

Under the banner of "beginnings and turning points," this issue of Basic Paper Airplane covers a wide expanse. Personal essays and vignettes that span from childhood swarms of bees to drinking cough syrup, kitchen dance parties to hopping trains, breaking out windows in the woods to taking over the streets in elementary school.

Along the way there are also essays on Gertrude Stein, huayno music of Peru, Eadweard Muybridge, and The Wright Brothers...[ continued ]

A series of thoughts about what it looks like to follow your dreams and have it look different than the people around you. 

Within: child artist, sports star, book obsession, the post office, falling in love at a D.A.R.E. graduation, a small tribute to children's book author James Stevenson, and much more. 32 pages, quarter-size.

An amazingly written zine about volunteer work and travels in Tanzania. Olympia writer Alicia LeDuc does a beautiful job covering both the humor and tragedy of her adventures and painting a portrait of life in the rural third world. Within: poisonous snakes, dodgeball, the pipi mafia, malaria, deadly papayas, convent life, HIV clinics, town festivals, local music, and more.

92 pages, half-letter size, includes four pages of black and white photos from Tanzania...[ continued ]

A clean, accessible guide to making DIY events happen. Perfect for those just getting into organizing DIY events and with reminders and ideas that even the seasoned organizer can benefit from. A strong focus on house shows and radical communities, but a lot of ideas that can function in a lot of DIY event situations.

Put together by Neil Campau (of Electrician and World History) and edited by a ton of really great folks--Zoe Boekbinder, CJ Boyd, Danah Olivetree, and Jamie Menzel, just to name a few...[ continued ]

Cheer the Eff Up, Jonas' unorthodox letter to his unborn child, holds so much in an entirely unassuming package. It's a time capsule that includes reflections on family, youthful ambitions, aging in punk, work, gender identity and fatherhood, and the way things change. It's humorous, heavy, and profound--often in the same sentence. Highly recommended.

56 pages, half-letter size.

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New issues of Cheer the Eff Up have come to be major events in zine circles. Describing what makes the zine so special and accessible is not easy—it's something you just need to experience to understand. In issue six, Jonas embraces the darkness of the past. Loss and mental health factor prominently into these stories. The ways Jonas makes you question the darkness and decide what attitude you'll take about the futility and/or beauty of life on earth is what makes this issue resonate for so long...[ continued ]

The history of bugs, vintage computer ads, the mother of invention, and Steve Jobs illegitimate daughter (in computer form) are just a few of the things you'll find within Classic Computing (formerly Historically Brewed). Even if you aren't a part of the subculture, you can still have lots of fun reading about it...[ continued ]