Zines

Four essays from Portland zinester and children's book author Cathy Camper (Lowriders in Space) about Arab-American identity, being a Brown person in mostly white settings, and biases in beauty standards.

Within: clothing colors by place, The Naked People of Color Bike Ride, pen names for reclaiming power. All pieces originally published in Women of Color Zine and collected together here for the first time...[ continued ]

A short lyric essay about facts, Texas, old friends, Olympia. Done up nicely in an old-school cut-and-paste collage style.

12 pages, half-letter size.

A single, long-form essay about Martha's journey through Cushing's disease and Addison's disease, and the lingering tumor she's chosen to not demonize or see as something separate. The Starfish is a surprising and exciting meditation on what it means to be in a body.

12 pages, half-letter size.

[ continued ]

"In Starvation Mode, Seattle’s Elissa Washuta—author of 2014’s genre-defying memoir of ethnic identity, sexual trauma, bipolar disorder, and independence, My Body Is a Book of Rules—crafts a personal accounting of her struggle for culinary control, and presents the guidelines she followed as she attempted to shape her body and mind through the food she consumed.

The book’s seemingly simple structure (a series of rules to eat and live by) contrasts with the powerful way she pulls readers into a complicated story of our needs and the cultural pressures that shape us...[ continued ]

Vignettes about the sun that span an impressive range. Nonfiction, fiction, myth, and things in between. How freckles age, a sellout friends' band, the sun's true size, the time it takes for the sun's light to reach earth, and so much more.

With words from: A.J. Michel (Syndicate Product), Amanda Brennan, Arthur Bruso, David Costill, Elly Blue, Jackie Yaeger, Jarod Roselló, Joe Biel, Jonah Matranga, Joseph Carlough, Justin Davis, Katie Haegele...[ continued ]

Comic artists and comic lovers think about comics and the importance of comics in their lives. (They even draw a few along the way.)

Within: A dusty comic book store in the '80s serving as salvation for a geeky teen girl; dealing with Asperger’s and learning social cues from comics; the current state of Heavy Metal; adapting The Secret Garden; a girl in the 70’s and her love of war comics; superheroes; Harvey Pekar; and much much more...[ continued ]

Last one! Using his real life experiences on and off game shows as the basis for this engrossing collection of essays, Taken for a Ride is part perzine and part pop culture analysis. It's funny, smart, well-written, and totally entertaining throughout.

36 pages, half-letter size.

[ continued ]

User Not Found is a pocket-sized chapbook on social media and life in the digital age. In a single, long-form lyric essay, Felicity explores our collective addiction from a variety of angles. It's a many-layered joyride of a think-piece. Highly recommended.

"Prompted by a sequence of discouraging internet encounters, Felicity Fenton attempts to free herself from the tendrils of an online world we know, but struggle to look away from...[ continued ]

In this issue of our favorite literary zine, seven writers take us around the world—from ancient ruins to the room of a nursing home—while writing under the theme of "Away."

Featuring work from: Charles Reaves, Andria Alefhi, Colette Hannahan, Betsy Houston, Pam Daghlian, M.P. McCune, and Lauren Georgia.

44 pages, quarter-size, color covers. Cover art by Portland's very own collage artist extraordinaire, Kevin Sampsell...[ continued ]

In this, the fifteenth installment of We'll Never Have Paris (the literary zine of all things never meant to be), writers tackle the sprawling mess that is America. 

Essays from Andria Alefhi, Lisa Fenger, Carol Wierzbicki, PF Dumanis, Adrienne Robillard, Sheetal Singh, A.M. Black, and M.P. McCune. Art by Annie Galvin and (Portland's own!) Gabriel Liston.

48 pages, quarter-size...[ continued ]