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Zines

M. Sabine Rear's Reverse Flâneur: On Being Blind, Glamorous, and Alone in Public is a graphic novel travelogue of Vienna. Meditating on the visibly disabled body while spending time in museums and being alone in public spaces. Nominated for an Ignatz Award. 

40 pages, half-letter size, thick matte covers.

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Part of Rachel Lee-Carman's continuing series of zines (Show & Tell, Shoe & Tail, Offerings of Grace & Mischief), The Thread is a whirlwind of travels, realizations, dance floors, and sunsets. 

Through hand-written text, photos, comics, and collage, Rachel's zines capture the kind of discovery that zines should embody. Everyday revelations while stumbling, all the highs and lows, figuring it out as you go...[ continued ]

In this issue of our favorite literary zine, seven writers take us around the world—from ancient ruins to the room of a nursing home—while writing under the theme of "Away."

Featuring work from: Charles Reaves, Andria Alefhi, Colette Hannahan, Betsy Houston, Pam Daghlian, M.P. McCune, and Lauren Georgia.

44 pages, quarter-size, color covers. Cover art by Portland's very own collage artist extraordinaire, Kevin Sampsell...[ continued ]

In this, the fifteenth installment of We'll Never Have Paris (the literary zine of all things never meant to be), writers tackle the sprawling mess that is America. 

Essays from Andria Alefhi, Lisa Fenger, Carol Wierzbicki, PF Dumanis, Adrienne Robillard, Sheetal Singh, A.M. Black, and M.P. McCune. Art by Annie Galvin and (Portland's own!) Gabriel Liston.

48 pages, quarter-size...[ continued ]

After over a decade in Portland, Oregon, Zach and his wife decide to move out before everything that was once good about the city gets sold off to the highest bidder. They decide on Zach's hometown of Rochester, New York and attempt to get their vintage home goods business, animals, and various belongings across the country. (Spoiler: Everything goes wrong.)

The same tragicomedy that Zach brought to his bestselling book Love is Not Constantly Wondering if You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life is in full effect here...[ continued ]