Zines

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook. We are not powerless to change this relationship. As creatives, we hold more power than we realize because our labor is one of the primary engines upon which the Facebook machine is built."

Comes with Keep Content Off Facebook sticker. 12 pages, half-letter size.

Know Your Vote, a workbook zine from Anna Jo Beck, seeks to help you make sense of the United States voting system and political structures. Prompting you to figure out your state's elections, representatives, and local government, this zine is a much-needed guide for anyone left confused by the (often ridiculously complex) American systems of democracy. 

From Beck's Biff Boff Bam Sock zine series. 24 pages, half-letter size.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to.

In large part, Mapping Out Utopia challenges the idea that the 1970s were when the ideals of the '60s burned out. While it may have looked like that on the surface, it's clear that many people saw this decade as a time to put the ideals into action. And these collectives, political organizations, alternative schools, feminist organizations, bookstores, and clinics are proof.

80 pages, half-letter size.

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines. Each volume maps out a different part of the city. This one takes a stab at the heart of the region: Boston. This volume offers overviews of almost 200 organizations, eleven hand-drawn maps, and a number of in-depth overviews on topics including gay liberation, black separatism, and church basements as countercultural command centers. From Operation Black to the Recycling Revolutionary Coop, it's all in here."

108 pages, 26 illustrations, 11 maps. Green cardstock cover, with off-white interior pages. Half-letter size, stapled wraps.

The Mapping Out Utopia zine series is stunning in the depth of its research and the way it examines local history as a microcosm of broad societal change. In this, the third and final issue, Devin looks at communities near the Boston area and the kinds of counterculture organizations that formed there in the 1970s. While mapping these organizations and their histories, he also provides brief histories of the environmental movement, corporate boycotts, consumer rights, the peace movement, food cooperatives, and so much more.

80 pages, half-letter size.

In Otherwise, their sequel to the excellent All Together workbook zine, Emma Percy guides us through better understanding and connecting to the world around us. Through questions, exercises, quotes, and research, Otherwise explores "ecological identity, climate grief + anger, the precarity + necessity of hope, and sparking creative resistance to the genocidal + ecocidal capitalist system."

44 pages, half-letter size. 

A fascinating scrapbook of headlines from the pandemic. Photos, pieces of articles, charts and graphs from along the way, laid out chronologically without additional commentary. 

64 pages, quarter-size.

Portraits and short biographies of nuns who "altered history for the betterment of people." Visionaries, activists, political prisoners, education reformers, pop singers, computer scientists, DJs, queer writers, and graffiti artists.

Within: Hildegard of Bingen, The Nuns of Selma, Ani Pachen, Mary Ward, Soeur Sourire, Mary Kenneth Keller, Mary Ignatius Davies, Corita Kent, Rosemary Curb, Nancy Manahan, and Megan Rice.

24 pages, half-legal size.

A highly recommended interview issue from this long-running Vancouver, B.C. punk zine. Community organizing, the perspective and challenges of being a DIY lifer, real-life sailing epics. Aaron Cometbus, Shellshag, Matt Hern, and more.
60 pages, half-letter size.

In Snacks in the Park, Portland zine legend Moe Bowstern (Xtra Tuf) meets up with interesting Portlanders in parks around the city. Along the way, there's bits of local history and far-ranging discussions. Casual and fun, but with plenty of depth, Snacks is an interesting ride from cover to cover.

Conversations with: rapper and activist Mic Crenshaw, film-score composers Shawn Parke and Kim Henninger, massage therapist and burlesque performer Shanta Prescott, community radio manager and activist Monica Beemer, furniture maker and salvager Preston Browning, and writer and activist Judith Arcana.

40 pages, half-letter size. Color covers, B&W insides.