Zines

In a series of interviews with queer women and non-binary folks, Fear, Safety, & Femmes examines what safety looks like. What places and people create a sense of safety? Which qualities in people create a sense of danger? What self-defense tools and techniques do people use to feel safer?

20 pages, cut half-letter size.

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Since 1991, Fluke has been creating great variety zines covering all realms of punk and underground culture. This new issue is particularly PACKED with goodness. Interviews with graphic novelist Nate Powell (March, Any Empire, Swallow Me Whole), mural artist Danny Martin, and skateboard magazine historian Kevin Marks (Look Back Library). Personal histories on Maximum Rocknroll, R...[ continued ]

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys...[ continued ]

A fantastic new issue of I Love Bad Movies, the movie review zine that is as hilarious as it is well-written and insightful. This issue’s theme: “Early and Late Roles” or, “Before and After They Were Famous.” It’s kind of brilliant.

The highlight: a wonderful interview with Alex Winter (AKA: Bill S. Preston, Esq., of Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure!) about his role in Death Wish 3 and Charles Bronson's love of bananas...[ continued ]

A deep-dive into the animated television show BoJack Horseman, by way of personal essays, comics, tarot, and interviews.

Within: alcoholism, international fandom, the history of screwball comedies, unlikeable cartoon women, absurdism, representation in voice acting, the power of Lisa Hanawalt, and much more. For fans, as well as those who can't understand what there is to love in a cartoon about addiction and depression...[ continued ]

Keesha and Joanie and Jane is a fictional story where, in a not-too-distant future, abortion is made illegal in the United States. Young women inspired by the work of Jane, the Chicago pre-Roe v Wade underground abortion service, get a grant to bring the original "Janes" to town to speak at their school as an excuse to talk out how to make their own underground abortion service.

Written by Portland author Judith Arcana —one of the original Janes —and brilliantly formatted like a Broadway Playbill by Eberhardt Press...[ continued ]

In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be...[ continued ]

Unlike anything else running today, the Nuts punk fanzine is always a wild ride. And if you just took the crazy-sexy-(cool)-Medusa-witch cover of this issue alone, you would already have one of the most unique things around. This issue is another ridiculously oversized extravaganza. Interviews with Dawn of Humans, Pharmakon, and Nomad. A punk paper that cries over Sinead O'Connor's "Black Boys on Mopeds...[ continued ]

Nuts! is the kind of thing that can come with giant newsprint masks and it's no big thing. Within: giant newsprint masks, interviews with Ajax and Goosebumps, an Olympia update, a Rap Report, Christmas with Glue, photos, posters, and more.

20 pages, on newsprint.

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One large folded sheet of newsprint turns into Brooklyn-by-way-of Olympia's favorite punk paper. Within: Zach from Gas Rag talks about his job, “Rancid” Dave Morse reviews the New York’s Alright Fest, and Gustavo Rivera writes about NYC nightlife. Warthog, S.H.I.T., Gag, and more.