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Zines

In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be...[ continued ]

Krissy Ponyboy chronicles her decades-long obsession with Beat Generation writers, and the obsession's gradual decline. Like all issues of Paper Crush, Dumping Kerouac is awesome, straightforward, and wise.

24 pages, quarter-size.

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A collaboration between Portland nonprofit Know Your City and writer Martha Grover (Somnambulist zine, The End of My Career), The People's Guide to Portland is an in-depth resource guide for marginalized people and communities, as well as a succinct and clear guide to being a good ally. 

Sections within: Chronically Ill/Disabled, Racial Justice, LGBTQIA+, Reproductive Rights, Gender Inequality, Youth, Folks in Recovery, Parenting/Child-Rearing, Survivors of Violent Crime, Survivors of Domestic & Sexual Violence, Housing: Renting and Houselessness, Mental Health, Environmental Justice, Low Income, Educate/Agitate/Organize, Self Care, Veteran Resources, Wealth & Voter Suppression...[ continued ]

Temporary sale! Two poetry zines in one by Tomas Moniz. In A Poetic Theory of Plate Tectonics, he looks at bodies in relation to the various movements of the earth. And in A Reclamation of Manhood, he looks at past joys and mistakes in an attempt to unlearn the socialized expectations of what manhood and fatherhood looks like.

With art from Ajuan Mance, Robert Liu-Trujillo, and Alicia Dornadic...[ continued ]

This issue of Pro Wrestling Feelings goes deep. There's an epic and fascinating interview with transgender poet Colette Arrand about wrestling as literary muse and her stints as a wrestler and commentator. Willow Maclay has an excellent essay on wrestling as cinema, and the sport's roots in both carnival shows and theater. There's also an interview with Dr. Jess Krenek about female pro-wrestling fandom and academia, as well as comics, poems, the dream match, and much more...[ continued ]

In its continuing effort to "untangle the emotional resonance of pro wrestling," Pro Wrestling Feelings #6 examines homophobia and transphobia at wrestling matches, the power imbalances between wrestlers and fans, and event promoter Tom Green discusses accessibility and creating welcoming environments. It also features a wrestling LARP and a queer wrestling RPG. A zine that oddball mega fans will love and where the uninitiated can get a peek into a fascinating world...[ continued ]

The latest issue of everyone's favorite wrestling zine. This issue focuses on the Best of the Super Juniors and the New Japan Pro-Wrestling league. A nuanced take on "cruiserweight" wrestling, this is a cool deep-dive for wrestling fans and a curious peek into a very specific subculture for everyone else. 

Within: Amanda Traphagan (Hiromu and His Boyfriends, Red Leather and Danger) on the Hiromu Takahashi/Dragon Lee feud; Angela Cosenzo examines the relationship between Takahashi and El Desperado; editor Ed Blair on the ephemeral nature of '00s indie wrestling and the impact of the Low-Ki/Amazing Red feud; and an interview with artist Yewon Kwon on gender exploration and fine-art commercialism...[ continued ]

This issue of Radical Domesticity is preparation for the fall and winter months. A guide to deciduous leaves, DIY bird feeders and seed, recipes for hot beverages and warming foods, how to keep a cold at bay.

Emma's brilliant introduction responds to the idea that maintaining a home is somehow not radical or feminist. Everything she has to say is so wise! Best line: "A chore wheel is not the beginning of a police state...[ continued ]

Safe Words is a lyrical mini-memoir of desire. Through a series of vignettes, longtime zinester Sarah Geo recounts her sexual experiences with men, traversing the good and the bad to shine a spotlight on sexual desire in all its complexities. Safe Words is also a reclaiming the sensual self after a pregnancy, a break-up, and years of seeing herself as "just a mother." 

Photos and layout by Omar Alan Pierce...[ continued ]

A short zine letter about gender, race, identity, and not-knowing from the author of Fixer Eraser and We, the Drowned. 

20 pages, quarter-size.

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