Zines

Now in its thirteenth year, We'll Never Have Paris is an institution. This issue of the all-memoir literary journal revolves around "hindsight" and within there are bald spots, guns, hearing aids, fandom, and so much more.

Essays by: Steven Svymbersky, Lisa Alexia, Amy Bobeda, Suzanne Present,​ Gustavo Rivera, LD Green, Anna Seregina, and Karen Lynch.

52 pages, quarter-size...[ continued ]

After over a decade in Portland, Oregon, Zach and his wife decide to move out before everything that was once good about the city gets sold off to the highest bidder. They decide on Zach's hometown of Rochester, New York and attempt to get their vintage home goods business, animals, and various belongings across the country. (Spoiler: Everything goes wrong.)

The same tragicomedy that Zach brought to his bestselling book Love is Not Constantly Wondering if You're Making the Biggest Mistake of Your Life is in full effect here...[ continued ]

Temporary sale! In the vein of his Fixer Eraser zine series, We, the Drowned #2 is Jonas' latest collection of curious short prose pieces. Under the banner of "wishes and ghost stories," the pieces within are filled with conversations, lies, playful tangents, and a lot of heart.

32 pages, quarter-size.

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Temporary sale! Mantras, old friends, name-calling, an imagined game. These are some of the odd pleasures of reading the latest batch of stories from Jonas (Fixer Eraser).

24 pages, half-letter size.

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The latest in Jonas Cannon's continued series of odd and hopeful stories about connection and disconnection. An offshoot of his Fixer Eraser zines, this issue of We, the Drowned contains unicorns, Foghat, and idea men. Told through letters, prose poems, and bar conversations.

The highlight: a conversation between Jonas, Cindy Crabb (Doris), and Alex Wrekk (Brainscan) about regret (or the lack thereof) and the many possible paths that could have been...[ continued ]

In What Are You Raising Them For?, Tim Devin looks at the counterculture shifts of the '60s and '70s and sees how it changed the way people parented their kids. Using '70s hippie literature and the experiences of adults raised in nontraditional settings as source material, Tim Devin examines where counterculture parenting ideas were coming from, how well they were working, and what we can take away from it all today...[ continued ]

A dreamy comic from UK artist Simon Moreton. Set in a '90s boyhood of meadows, sci-fi VHS tapes, MTV, crushes, first kisses.

Published by Kilgore Books. 40 pages, half-letter size. Color covers, B&W insides.

An introduction to the personal zine (by way of a big box, full of zines, opened decades ago). A fun little journey that will make you want to write your own story, take your own journey.

16 pages, half-letter size.

When Death Knocks is a personal zine written by Death himself. Or, more specifically, written by a lowly "Transition Officer" working for the agency of Death. A morbid and tender piece of writing from the postmortem zine scene. I can say with some certainty that there's nothing else quite like this.

24 pages, quarter-size, cut-and-paste.

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The new chapbook from Andria Alefhi (of the long-running literary zine We'll Never Have Paris) is a look at grief over time. Told through journal entries, letters, and short essay-like chapters, it documents 16 years of memories, regrets, and personal growth.

Both a grief memoir and a tool for those preparing for parent loss and others who have lost a parent to write their own story, When Your Mom is First to Go is a unique journey through living with loss and finding paths to acceptance...[ continued ]