Zines

Origin stories, séances, astronaut egos, and so many more short stories about (and relationships with) the moon.

Edited by Joseph Carlough at Displaced Snail Publications. With work by: Carolyn Busa, Charlene Kwon, Heather Butts, Hrishikesh Hirway, Jesse Reklaw, Joseph Carlough, Josh Berwanger, Katie Haegele, Kishi Bashi, Kristen Martin, Marguerite Dabaie, Michael Jasorka, Mike Adams, Mocha Ishibashi, Molly Rice, and Thaddeus Rutkowski...[ continued ]

Simple and practical suggestions to help you get your words onto the page. Straightforward, laid out nicely, and accessible to everyone.

Also included within: a fun abridged history of writing and communication tools.

28 pages, half-letter size, cover colors vary.

A mug-shaped zine about mugs called, simply, Mugs. Collecting them, loving them, stories about them. 

44 pages, quarter-size.

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Every issue of the My Complicated Relationship With Food zine series is impossibly good. These "reviews of some of the things we put in our mouths" are surprising and bizarre and, after years of between-issue waiting, Volume Four is finally here and well worth the wait.

Within: getting drunk off mouthwash, potato appreciation, trying to define what a sandwich actually is, the case against gelato, and so much more...[ continued ]

In My Complicated Relationship With Food, Zach discusses his unusual relationship with food by reviewing a variety of (seemingly) simple and common foods. What comes out is uncommonly hilarious and fascinating.

And any zine that starts by saying, "I have weird thoughts about food. I am well aware that many of my ideas are ridiculous and probably wrong" is bound to be something special...[ continued ]

The bludgeoning powers of pineapples, the lie of Florida orange juice, the joys of drinking applesauce from the jar, and why fancy ice cream is just a pathetic search for meaning.

Great for coffee tables, as small gifts, and reading aloud to friends.

20 pages, quarter-size.

Never has a collection of opinions on ordinary foods been so incredibly funny. 

20 pages, quarter size.

Old-school variety-zine style. Quizzes, cut-and-paste horoscopes, an advice column, reviews of old movies, poems, comics.

16 pages, half-letter size.

One Punk's Guide to Star Trek is both a great read and an accessible guide for the newcomer (as well as those who have just dipped a toe into the Trek universe). Effortlessly summing up the complex backstories and timelines, Seattle Trekkie-punk Kayla Greet gives a primer to 50+ years of the best in secular-humanist social-commentary sci-fi television programming. 

Focusing on The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine, but also covering previous and present series, she gives a brief explanation of each and lists key entry-point episodes...[ continued ]

Leave it to PonyBoy Press to write a concise history of everything you ever wanted to know about I Love Lucy. Early TV history, the many ways the show was ahead of its time, and all the dirt behind the first hugely successful American sitcom.

Profiles on Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, William Frawley, and (of course) Lucille Ball. Plus the best episodes, eras of the show, the bad parts, song lyrics, recommended viewing, and a reading list...[ continued ]