Zines

Last copy! The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war.

60 pages, half-letter size. Complete with maps and photos and Lyft feedback. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

In the second issue of Behind the Wheel, Kelly Dessaint, in addition to doing Lyft, becomes an Uber driver and brings us behind the scenes of the so-called sharing economy—in all its less-than-glamorous glory.

Within: sex clubs, tech bros, bottled water entitlement, a thousand iPhones, plus $500 and a taco. 

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

Behind the Wheel #3 documents Kelly Dessaint's transition from driving Uber and Lyft to becoming a certified taxi cabi driver. Collected from his San Francisco Examiner column, along with new material, this issue is perfect for anyone wondering about the economic and social consequences of rideshare services. 

Within: pukers, erotic massage parlors, infiltrating a tech conference, life as a vice chauffeur, and the cabbie enigma. Not for the faint of heart.

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

This long-awaited new issue of Behind the Wheel comes a few years into Kelly's stint as a licensed cab drive, and he's in full politicized grumpy cabbie mode for this one. A continuation of his look at an ever-changing San Francisco and a nuanced take-down of Uber and Lyft, this issue of Behind the Wheel looks at the realities and logistics of surviving and supporting a family as a driver for hire. As Kelly writes, "Driving a taxi has become a form of resistance—a refusal to accept this notion that the world is supposed to be a particular way."

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

Behind the Zines is a zine about zines. Think of it as a small-scale Broken Pencil or Xerography Debt, a biannual publication that puts a spotlight on what's going on in the zine community. In this issue: scene reports, zine fest travels, zine spreadsheets, zine reluctance, and zine reviews. It asks how personal is too personal, and includes an interview with Kara Comegys of the zine Clumsy, discussing zines, sexual assault, and using art to heal. It also has the results of a zine survey, so there's even zine pie charts, statistics, and graphs.

Contributors include: Billy McCall (Proof I Exist), Jess Hogan (Neither/Nor Distro), Jake McWilliams (Making Edible Playdough is Hegemonic), Kelly Shortandqueer (Shortandqueer zine), Keith Helt (Flotation Device), Anna Jo Beck (Biff Boff Bam Sock), Ed Tillman, Ed Chops (The Word Distro), Frederick Moe (Tin Can Telephone), Jessica Mills, Giz, and Kari Tervo (Shards Of Glass In Your Eye!).

40 pages, half-letter size.

How does Cometbus, after 38 years as a zine, just get better and better? It's a mystery, but it does. Issue 59 is a deep dive into both death and longevity in the underground. In short: what does sustainability look like in counterculture? This question takes Aaron on a journey from the Epitaph Records and Thrasher magazine offices to hanging out at a punk-owned vegan donut shop and a tamale stand at the farmer's market with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile and Sex Stains fame). It's thought-provoking, fun, open, honest, and just the right amount of curmudgeonly.

As Aaron writes: "The question was, could you establish yourself without becoming the establishment? Because that was the goal, as far as I was concerned: to build institutions that served our needs, and helped produce and distribute the art we created. To make spaces where we could express ourselves, like clubs and cafes—and magazines, which were gathering places as well. I was sick to death of all the noble failures. Instead of mourning our losses, I wanted to look at projects that had lasted."

140 pages, perfect-bound.

John Porcellino's King-Cat Comics is an absolute feel-good joy. And King-Cat has been such a joy for over 30 years now. (How we waited this long to pick it up is a mystery, and we apologize.) In issue 79 there are science club comics, night poem comics, cub scout comics, record store memories from the 1980s, a really sweet road trip comic, and a really special one about discovering zines for the first time.

Also: a comic from Gabrielle Bell, letters (and drawings) to the editor from David Lasky and Chester Brown, a top forty, so much more.

36 pages, half-letter size.

We always love Minor Leagues, U.K. comic artist/graphic memoirist Simon Moreton's ongoing zine series. Dreamy fluid comic art, solid prose, collaged bits and pieces, a fun variety show of a zine. In this issue: notes from America, birdwatching, topographies, wallpaper, foxes, home. 

64 pages, full magazine size.

Martha Grover's story of coming home from Rome and discovering herself ten grand in debt to the IRS. Tax Deductible Rome is a travel story mixed with humorous considerations of what tax deductions look like in a life of an artist and writer. 

Illustrated by Katy Ellis O'Brien. 16 pages, half-letter size.

Part of Rachel Lee-Carman's continuing series of zines (Show & TellShoe & TailOfferings of Grace & Mischief), The Thread is a whirlwind of travels, realizations, dance floors, and sunsets. 

Through hand-written text, photos, comics, and collage, Rachel's zines capture the kind of discovery that zines should embody. Everyday revelations while stumbling, all the highs and lows, figuring it out as you go.

32 pages, half-letter size, color covers, b&w insides.