Zines

"Zach Ellis’s debut, Being, is a remarkable, lyrical memoir that works to put into words what it is to be transgender. It’s a book about relationships, about growing up, about the body and mind, about desire, about parenting, about how we adjust to huge changes, and about whom we know ourselves to be. It’s a funny book, an honest book, and a book that cuts deep into you."

Originally released through Future Tense Books' Instant Future series. 36 pages, half-letter size. 

Written and assembled during the pandemic as a way to remember how intimate and celebratory live, small-scale, do-it-yourself shows can be, Best Show Ever brings together nearly 20 voices and distinct experiences. Scenes from all over the U.S., basements and yards and art spaces, makeshift stages, day-long festivals, shows from the 1990s, shows from just before things shut down. All collected here.

As it says on the first page: "This zine is a love letter to the basements and community spaces that felt like home. The songs that lived on mix tapes and CDs in our headphones and in our hearts, right up until the moment we got to yell the words in person, with a bunch of smiling strangers. This zine is dedicated to the bands and crowds that made us feel less alone. a nod to some of the best nights of our lives. This zine is for you."

With words from: Marigold, Colleen Fitzgerald, Jonquil Moore, Diego Romero-Aros, Julia Koschler, Toria Muñoz, Jackie Snyder, Ian Vanek, Peyton Kuzel, Shannon, Dakota Floyd, Joshua Hoey, Johnny Gainer, Shannon Bodrogi, Chris, Dandy Decipher, Dylan Gregor, Alyssa Giannini, and Rachel Jackson.

32 pages, half-letter size.

In a series of interviews with queer women and non-binary folks, Fear, Safety, & Femmes examines what safety looks like. What places and people create a sense of safety? Which qualities in people create a sense of danger? What self-defense tools and techniques do people use to feel safer?

20 pages, cut half-letter size.

Perfect for both horror insiders and outsiders, Gina and Joe Talk About Queer Horror mixes memoir and critical analysis in a fun, accessible way. This zine is many things, but at its heart it's simply a really good read.

In the introduction, Gina writes, "The richness of horror—and especially the way horror intersects with the LGBTQ+ experience—means there are different ways to see ourselves reflected in the genre. So we're all monsters (hell yeah!) and we're all heroes (for sure!)—both and. Who says it has to be just one or the other?"

28 pages, half-letter size. 

How to Support Your Non-Binary Family Member is a welcoming and accessible guide to navigating a non-binary gender transition with a family member, friend, or loved one. The zine is split into three sections: Processing, Understanding, and Support. It addresses particular situations (parents of adults, parents of teens, siblings and extended family, etc), answers some common questions (the differences between orientation, sex, and gender; what is non-binary gender?, etc), and suggests straightforward ways you can offer support.

While geared towards parents, this zine is useful for anyone who desires to gain a better understanding of how they can support their non-binary loved ones. 

52 pages, half-letter size.

Songwriter and poet Sara Renberg begins her zine series looking at the often-maligned solo career of former Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus. Focusing on his 2001 solo debut (before officially becoming Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks), she takes us on a joyous song-by-song investigation of why people hate it and how much there is to love. It's a fun read, even if you don't know the album. Along the way, there's the end of Pavement, the making of Silver Jews' American Water, and life in Portland, Oregon.

The zine is also a personal journey of a rural kid in the big city, discovering indie music, coming out, and dating girls for the first time (all to the soundtrack of this album).

32 pages, half-letter size.

In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be."

Interviews with Brontez Purnell (Since I Laid My Burden Down), Colin Atrophy Hagendorf (Slice Harvester), Larry TV (Pretty Pretty), Shane Parish (Ahleuchatistas), Tomas Moniz (Rad Dad), and others.

32 pages, half-legal size. Cover art by Icky Dunn.

Last copy! ​​​​​​​The newest zine from Nomadic Youth, a London-based DIY youth project that provides free pop-up activities to teenagers across the city and supports youth activism and mutual aid. This small art zine celebrates Pride and the Black Lives Matter movement with 11 pieces of art by young people of color and/or young people who are LGBT+. 

20 pages, full-color, quarter-size. Comes with free sticker.

A collaboration between Portland nonprofit Know Your City and writer Martha Grover (Somnambulist zine, The End of My Career), The People's Guide to Portland is an in-depth resource guide for marginalized people and communities, as well as a succinct and clear guide to being a good ally. 

Sections within: Chronically Ill/Disabled, Racial Justice, LGBTQIA+, Reproductive Rights, Gender Inequality, Youth, Folks in Recovery, Parenting/Child-Rearing, Survivors of Violent Crime, Survivors of Domestic & Sexual Violence, Housing: Renting and Houselessness, Mental Health, Environmental Justice, Low Income, Educate/Agitate/Organize, Self Care, Veteran Resources, Wealth & Voter Suppression.

And featuring an all-star list of Portland contributors: Katy Ellis O'Brien, Celeste Chicas, Olivia VanSlyke, Bobby Hayden, Max Key, Lydia Grijalva, Kjerstin Johnson, Jaden-Thiago Fraga, Katie Ash, HopSkotch Sunday, Ruby Story, Jamani Ward-Leis, and Trisha Shozuya.

50 pages, half-letter size.

Last copy! This issue of Pro Wrestling Feelings goes deep. There's an epic and fascinating interview with transgender poet Colette Arrand about wrestling as literary muse and her stints as a wrestler and commentator. Willow Maclay has an excellent essay on wrestling as cinema, and the sport's roots in both carnival shows and theater. There's also an interview with Dr. Jess Krenek about female pro-wrestling fandom and academia, as well as comics, poems, the dream match, and much more.

60 pages, half-letter size. Cover art by Sage Coffey.