Zines

Last two copies! In an attempt to figure out the last record he would ever sell, Danny Noonan writes the story of a skittish teenager’s discovery of punk that leads him to house shows and eventually a move across the country. It’s a celebration of record stores that spans 25 years and explores the anxiety of youth, the community of punk, and how much it sucks not to be able to find a job when you need it the most...[ continued ]

Cometbus #55 could be looked at two ways: A treatise on growing up without giving up, or proof that even the most dedicated proponent of youth culture grows old. Either way, it’s fascinating. It’s coming from a life in punk, leftist politics, and DIY culture, but you don’t need to be interested in any of that to be interested in the stories he tells.

72 pages, half-letter size...[ continued ]

Addicting and perfectly bizarre, Cometbus #58 is a story about finding home in a greasy-spoon diner full of combative old-timers. It's a ride full of strangeness and surprises.

44 pages, half-letter size.

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How does Cometbus, after 38 years as a zine, just get better and better? It's a mystery, but it does. Issue 59 is a deep dive into both death and longevity in the underground. In short: what does sustainability look like in counterculture? This question takes Aaron on a journey from the Epitaph Records and Thrasher magazine offices to hanging out at a punk-owned vegan donut shop and a tamale stand at the farmer's market with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile and Sex Stains fame)...[ continued ]

Since 1991, Fluke has been creating great variety zines covering all realms of punk and underground culture. This new issue is particularly PACKED with goodness. Interviews with graphic novelist Nate Powell (March, Any Empire, Swallow Me Whole), mural artist Danny Martin, and skateboard magazine historian Kevin Marks (Look Back Library). Personal histories on Maximum Rocknroll, R...[ continued ]

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys...[ continued ]

This DIY punk venue history is more than just an archive of the 21st-century Boston punk scene (though it is, very much, that), but also a brief history of DIY venues in general. Tracking the beginnings of the anti-corporate punk spirit of the late '70s and early '80s, to the "no stage" ethos of the early '90s, to the house show culture of the 2000s, this zine is for anyone interested in DIY culture...[ continued ]

In Masculinities, Cindy Crabb (Doris) explores how we're each individually taught about what masculinity is. The zine focuses on the role models (positive or problematic or often both) who guided that education and how it played out. As she says in her introduction, she wants to "shake [masculinity] up—look at all the varied ways people are taught what it means to be a man, and where they found resistance, examples of other ways to be...[ continued ]

Unlike anything else running today, the Nuts punk fanzine is always a wild ride. And if you just took the crazy-sexy-(cool)-Medusa-witch cover of this issue alone, you would already have one of the most unique things around. This issue is another ridiculously oversized extravaganza. Interviews with Dawn of Humans, Pharmakon, and Nomad. A punk paper that cries over Sinead O'Connor's "Black Boys on Mopeds...[ continued ]

Nuts! is the kind of thing that can come with giant newsprint masks and it's no big thing. Within: giant newsprint masks, interviews with Ajax and Goosebumps, an Olympia update, a Rap Report, Christmas with Glue, photos, posters, and more.

20 pages, on newsprint.

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