Zines

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes. "Everything is at stake, but we have everything to gain by trying."

40 pages, half-letter size. 

Cometbus #55 could be looked at two ways: A treatise on growing up without giving up, or proof that even the most dedicated proponent of youth culture grows old. Either way, it’s fascinating. It’s coming from a life in punk, leftist politics, and DIY culture, but you don’t need to be interested in any of that to be interested in the stories he tells.

72 pages, half-letter size.

A primer on how not to be a dick. Don't Be a Dick! serves as an introductory guide to understanding consent, toxic masculinity, rape culture, the porn industry, and more. Well-written and accessible.

36 pages, half-letter size, revised edition, cover colors vary.

A great issue of Doris. Thinking about what it means to both have close friends and be part of a community. Gratitude for the life lessons Mom taught. A conversation with imprisoned environmental activist Marius Mason. And the first interview in Cindy Crabb's "Anarchists Over 40" series, with Portland's own Icky Dunn of the Justseeds Arts Collective.

48 pages, oblong quarter-size.

In For Your Health, Anna Jo Beck provides a primer to health insurance in the United States—in all its complex, ever-changing, inhumane glory. Within: defining how health insurance works, choosing an insurance plan, mitigating cost, and so much more. The best part: Beck's brief history of health insurance in America and her thoughts and insights on the corrupt system people in this country are navigating.

From Beck's Biff Boff Bam Sock zine series. 32 pages, half-letter size.

Keesha and Joanie and Jane is a fictional story where, in a not-too-distant future, abortion is made illegal in the United States. Young women inspired by the work of Jane, the Chicago pre-Roe v Wade underground abortion service, get a grant to bring the original "Janes" to town to speak at their school as an excuse to talk out how to make their own underground abortion service.

Written by Portland author Judith Arcana —one of the original Janes —and brilliantly formatted like a Broadway Playbill by Eberhardt Press. The story is followed by an excellent Q+A with author Judith Arcana at the end of the chapbook.

64 pages, A5 size, full color.

A thoughtful zine that asks artists to reexamine how they use Facebook and how Facebook uses them. Not a call to boycott the platform entirely, but to simply think deeply about it and seek solutions beyond it. Written by Paul DeGeorge of Harry & The Potters.

As he so wisely writes in the introduction, Keep Content Off Facebook hopes to give "creative communities a starting point for more closely examining their relationship with Facebook. We are not powerless to change this relationship. As creatives, we hold more power than we realize because our labor is one of the primary engines upon which the Facebook machine is built."

Comes with Keep Content Off Facebook sticker. 12 pages, half-letter size.

Know Your Vote, a workbook zine from Anna Jo Beck, seeks to help you make sense of the United States voting system and political structures. Prompting you to figure out your state's elections, representatives, and local government, this zine is a much-needed guide for anyone left confused by the (often ridiculously complex) American systems of democracy. 

From Beck's Biff Boff Bam Sock zine series. 24 pages, half-letter size.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to.

In large part, Mapping Out Utopia challenges the idea that the 1970s were when the ideals of the '60s burned out. While it may have looked like that on the surface, it's clear that many people saw this decade as a time to put the ideals into action. And these collectives, political organizations, alternative schools, feminist organizations, bookstores, and clinics are proof.

80 pages, half-letter size.

The second volume of Tim Devin's epic delve into the counterculture movements of the 1970s. Using the greater Boston area as a microcosm, he maps out the diverse manifestations of people organizing, working, and living collectively.

"Mapping Out Utopia is a three-part look at the Boston area's 1970s counterculture, based on listings found in old countercultural directories and magazines. Each volume maps out a different part of the city. This one takes a stab at the heart of the region: Boston. This volume offers overviews of almost 200 organizations, eleven hand-drawn maps, and a number of in-depth overviews on topics including gay liberation, black separatism, and church basements as countercultural command centers. From Operation Black to the Recycling Revolutionary Coop, it's all in here."

108 pages, 26 illustrations, 11 maps. Green cardstock cover, with off-white interior pages. Half-letter size, stapled wraps.