Zines

From Tim Devin's Magical Spaces series, 55 Norfolk St. looks at the magical past of one shopfront in Cambridge, Massachusetts. What was a small grocery store for the first half of the 20th century became a home for arts collectives, tenants' rights organizations, performances spaces, independent galleries, and a politically-radical player-piano-busker known as Piano Dave. It's been called the Mobius Artists Group, Eviction Free Zone, Meme, 55 Norfolk, among other names, and this zine records all of those histories.

Assembled through archival material and interviews with Al Nidle, Alice Vogler, E. Stephen, Jane Wang, Jason Pramas, Mary Regan, Meg Rotzel, Rob Chalfen, and Sandrine Schaefer.

44 pages, half-letter size.

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes. "Everything is at stake, but we have everything to gain by trying."

40 pages, half-letter size. 

At this point, this is a classic of the modern zine canon. Building is a cleanly laid out, accessible guide to making DIY events happen. Perfect for those just getting into organizing DIY events and with reminders and ideas that even the seasoned organizer can benefit from. A strong focus on house shows and radical communities, but a lot of ideas that can function in a lot of DIY event situations.

Put together by Neil Campau (of Electrician and World History) and edited by a ton of really great folks—Fred Thomas, Zoe Boekbinder, CJ Boyd, Danah Olivetree, Dustin Krcatovich, and Jamie Menzel, just to name a few.

Published by DoDiy.org. 44 pages, half-letter size.

Cometbus #55 could be looked at two ways: A treatise on growing up without giving up, or proof that even the most dedicated proponent of youth culture grows old. Either way, it’s fascinating. It’s coming from a life in punk, leftist politics, and DIY culture, but you don’t need to be interested in any of that to be interested in the stories he tells.

72 pages, half-letter size.

A primer on how not to be a dick. Don't Be a Dick! serves as an introductory guide to understanding consent, toxic masculinity, rape culture, the porn industry, and more. Well-written and accessible.

36 pages, half-letter size, revised edition, cover colors vary.

A back-issue fave from one of the best zines ever. Long personal stories that look both outward and inward in surprising ways. The opening piece on love is possibly one of the best Doris moments, going through the many different kinds of love, the ways it can look and the ways it can change us.

36 pages, half-letter size.

Doris #30 is full of so many treasures: capturing a swarm of bees, finding community in new places, telling tour stories, forming study groups, and so much more. In it's longest and most vital piece, Cindy interviews sexual abuse survivors and meditates on how to think differently about accountability processes.

32 pages, half-legal size.

A great issue of Doris. Thinking about what it means to both have close friends and be part of a community. Gratitude for the life lessons Mom taught. A conversation with imprisoned environmental activist Marius Mason. And the first interview in Cindy Crabb's "Anarchists Over 40" series, with Portland's own Icky Dunn of the Justseeds Arts Collective.

48 pages, oblong quarter-size.

Farm & Wilderness Report Zine #1 focuses on the entwined histories of Total Loss Farm and Montague Farm as part of a deep dive into the communal farm movement and underground press movement of the 1960s and early '70s.

This zine revises and combines the information from the first and second Farm & Wilderness Report zines, while also kicking off a new zine series. 

48 pages, half-letter size.

In For Your Health, Anna Jo Beck provides a primer to health insurance in the United States—in all its complex, ever-changing, inhumane glory. Within: defining how health insurance works, choosing an insurance plan, mitigating cost, and so much more. The best part: Beck's brief history of health insurance in America and her thoughts and insights on the corrupt system people in this country are navigating.

From Beck's Biff Boff Bam Sock zine series. 32 pages, half-letter size.