Zines

From Tim Devin's Magical Spaces series, 55 Norfolk St. looks at the magical past of one shopfront in Cambridge, Massachusetts. What was a small grocery store for the first half of the 20th century became a home for arts collectives, tenants' rights organizations, performances spaces, independent galleries, and a politically-radical player-piano-busker known as Piano Dave. It's been called the Mobius Artists Group, Eviction Free Zone, Meme, 55 Norfolk, among other names, and this zine records all of those histories.

Assembled through archival material and interviews with Al Nidle, Alice Vogler, E. Stephen, Jane Wang, Jason Pramas, Mary Regan, Meg Rotzel, Rob Chalfen, and Sandrine Schaefer.

44 pages, half-letter size.

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes. "Everything is at stake, but we have everything to gain by trying."

40 pages, half-letter size. 

JB Antonia $5.00

A rare, almost-sublime zine about place, memory, and lost history. About the ways things change and stay the same. About how the place you're from shapes who you become. About growing up in a small Midwestern town without a zip code, a place not on most maps. 

As JB writes in the introduction: "I never read about or saw anything that looked like where I grew up. I was always on the lookout, but depictions of rural areas I encountered didn't feel familiar, seemed to picture a world that was too remote, too friendly, too simple, too impoverished, too sinister, or too romantic...This is an attempt to capture was I know, what I've learned, and what I remember about Antonia." HIGHLY recommended!

48 pages, half-letter size, cover colors vary.

Last copy! The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war.

60 pages, half-letter size. Complete with maps and photos and Lyft feedback. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

Last two copies! In the second issue of Behind the Wheel, Kelly Dessaint, in addition to doing Lyft, becomes an Uber driver and brings us behind the scenes of the so-called sharing economy—in all its less-than-glamorous glory.

Within: sex clubs, tech bros, bottled water entitlement, a thousand iPhones, plus $500 and a taco. 

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

Behind the Wheel #3 documents Kelly Dessaint's transition from driving Uber and Lyft to becoming a certified taxi cabi driver. Collected from his San Francisco Examiner column, along with new material, this issue is perfect for anyone wondering about the economic and social consequences of rideshare services. 

Within: pukers, erotic massage parlors, infiltrating a tech conference, life as a vice chauffeur, and the cabbie enigma. Not for the faint of heart.

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

This long-awaited new issue of Behind the Wheel comes a few years into Kelly's stint as a licensed cab drive, and he's in full politicized grumpy cabbie mode for this one. A continuation of his look at an ever-changing San Francisco and a nuanced take-down of Uber and Lyft, this issue of Behind the Wheel looks at the realities and logistics of surviving and supporting a family as a driver for hire. As Kelly writes, "Driving a taxi has become a form of resistance—a refusal to accept this notion that the world is supposed to be a particular way."

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series.

With the hyperbolic zeal and rancor of a true bookseller, Aaron Cometbus brings to life his chosen family: the booksellers of New York City. A Bestiary of Booksellers is for anyone who has sold books long enough to have it seep into their identity, but it’s also for all manner of book addicts, subculture scholars, obsessives, and night owls.

112 pages, half-letter size, perfect-bound.

Addicting and perfectly bizarre, Cometbus #58 is a story about finding home in a greasy-spoon diner full of combative old-timers. It's a ride full of strangeness and surprises.

44 pages, half-letter size.

In the first volume of Mapping Out Utopia, Tim Devin looks at a wide range of counterculture organizations in 1970s Cambridge, Massachusetts. While its focus at first glance seems local (and will hold particular interest to those familiar with Cambridge), Devin uses the place as a microcosm of the time period examining the larger-scale movements these organizations were connected to.

In large part, Mapping Out Utopia challenges the idea that the 1970s were when the ideals of the '60s burned out. While it may have looked like that on the surface, it's clear that many people saw this decade as a time to put the ideals into action. And these collectives, political organizations, alternative schools, feminist organizations, bookstores, and clinics are proof.

80 pages, half-letter size.