Zines

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes...[ continued ]

The first issue of Behind the Wheel is one of those instant zine classics that only come along every so often. Kelly Dessaint becomes a Lyft driver in a rapidly changing San Francisco and chaos ensues. Dessaint, an old-school zine curmudgeon of the highest order, is the perfect guide for this journey—never bought in, ever out of place, always questioning. 

Within: learning the ropes, techwads, cops, required fist bumps, class war...[ continued ]

In the second issue of Behind the Wheel, Kelly Dessaint, in addition to doing Lyft, becomes an Uber driver and brings us behind the scenes of the so-called sharing economy—in all its less-than-glamorous glory.

Within: sex clubs, tech bros, bottled water entitlement, a thousand iPhones, plus $500 and a taco. 

60 pages, half-letter size. Part of the Piltdownlad​ zine series...[ continued ]

Behind the Wheel #3 documents Kelly Dessaint's transition from driving Uber and Lyft to becoming a certified taxi cabi driver. Collected from his San Francisco Examiner column, along with new material, this issue is perfect for anyone wondering about the economic and social consequences of rideshare services. 

Within: pukers, erotic massage parlors, infiltrating a tech conference, life as a vice chauffeur, and the cabbie enigma...[ continued ]

This long-awaited new issue of Behind the Wheel comes a few years into Kelly's stint as a licensed cab drive, and he's in full politicized grumpy cabbie mode for this one. A continuation of his look at an ever-changing San Francisco and a nuanced take-down of Uber and Lyft, this issue of Behind the Wheel looks at the realities and logistics of surviving and supporting a family as a driver for hire...[ continued ]

This issue of Clock Tower Nine collects hand-drawn maps from 16 writers, cartoonists, and former dishwashers. 

"Maps aren't just instructions to get you from one place to another," writes editor Danny Noonan. "They are invitations to adventures, guides to get home safely, and hopefully a nice piece of art. Maps tell stories, sometimes in the past tense, other times in the future...[ continued ]

With the hyperbolic zeal and rancor of a true bookseller, Aaron Cometbus brings to life his chosen family: the booksellers of New York City. A Bestiary of Booksellers is for anyone who has sold books long enough to have it seep into their identity, but it’s also for all manner of book addicts, subculture scholars, obsessives, and night owls.

112 pages, half-letter size, perfect-bound...[ continued ]

Addicting and perfectly bizarre, Cometbus #58 is a story about finding home in a greasy-spoon diner full of combative old-timers. It's a ride full of strangeness and surprises.

44 pages, half-letter size.

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This DIY punk venue history is more than just an archive of the 21st-century Boston punk scene (though it is, very much, that), but also a brief history of DIY venues in general. Tracking the beginnings of the anti-corporate punk spirit of the late '70s and early '80s, to the "no stage" ethos of the early '90s, to the house show culture of the 2000s, this zine is for anyone interested in DIY culture...[ continued ]

A reprint of this 2008 issue of Keep Loving, Keep Fighting. Forty pages of feeling at home in New Orleans, communication between friends, death, visiting Montreal, and moving away.

Letterpressed covers. 32 pages, quarter-size.

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