Zines

A zine in tribute to a maligned beauty of pop culture's past: the compact cassette tape. Twenty writers, musicians, DJs, label owners, publishers, and comic artists tell stories of how cassette tapes have affected their lives, for better or worse. 

Within: the art of the mixtape, the importance of the boombox, the intimacy of the Walkman. Plus tales of recording with cassettes, performing with cassettes, releasing cassettes, falling in love with cassettes. Nostalgia, subversion, frustration, possibility.

Contributions from: Andrew Barton, Ariel Birks, Karleigh Frisbie Brogan, Aaron Burch, Laura Daegling, Tim Devin, Fukumup, Aaron Gilbreath, Cynthia Carmina Gómez, Jack Lewis, Chask'e Lindgren, Pat Maley, Jason Martin, Sara Renberg, Kevin Sampsell, Gina Sarti, Christopher Sutton, Tucker Theodore, and Alexis Wolf.

Cover art by Rachel Lee-Carman. Risograph-printed throughout by Whatnow Press. 60 pages, half-letter size. 

A deep-dive into the animated television show BoJack Horseman, by way of personal essays, comics, tarot, and interviews.

Within: alcoholism, international fandom, the history of screwball comedies, unlikeable cartoon women, absurdism, representation in voice acting, the power of Lisa Hanawalt, and much more. For fans, as well as those who can't understand what there is to love in a cartoon about addiction and depression. 

With words from: Joshua James Amberson, Timothy Day, Jessica Fonvergne, Lauren Hobson, Tessa Livingstone, M.L. Schepps, Jourdain Searles, and Molly E. Simas. Plus an interview with Leca from BoJack Hidden Jokes

Illustrations from: Eileen Chavez, Ross Jackson, Naomi Marshall, and Liz Yerby. Cover and back cover art by Sarah Mirk. 

Winner of the Broken Pencil Best Fanzine of 2020 award. All proceeds from the zine benefit Black Resilience Fund and the National Lawyers Guild.

Printed by Eberhardt Press. 68 pages, half-letter size. 

One Punk's Guide to Star Trek is both a great read and an accessible guide for the newcomer (as well as those who have just dipped a toe into the Trek universe). Effortlessly summing up the complex backstories and timelines, Seattle Trekkie-punk Kayla Greet gives a primer to 50+ years of the best in secular-humanist social-commentary sci-fi television programming. 

Focusing on The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine, but also covering previous and present series, she gives a brief explanation of each and lists key entry-point episodes. It's hard to come out of this zine without wanting to watch!

There's also plenty of fantastic lines about what Star Trek says about the world-at-large and what it inspires in her. As she writes in the zine, "When I feel stuck as a working class citizen just trying to make it to the next paycheck among people who have more than they'll ever need, as well as people struggling even worse than me, I think of the Federation and how I can implement and model that type of society in the world around me. It feeds my brain with possibilities and my heart with hope. So if you ask me, Star Trek is just about as punk as it gets."

Illustrated by Ben Snakepit (of Snake Pit zine), edited by Todd Taylor (of Razorcake). 32 pages, half-letter size.

A completely stunning zine celebrating the women of '50s, '60s, and '70s folk music. A nice mix of well-known, recently rediscovered, and lesser-known artists. Biographies and gorgeous pen-and-ink drawings for each artist.

Included within: Vashti Bunyan, Connie Converse, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Carolyn Hester, Judee Sill, Judy Collins, Melanie Safka, Margo Guryan, Mary Travers, Karen Dalton, Mimi Farina, Nico, Sibylle Baier, Odetta, and Buffy Sainte-Marie.

40 pages, A5-size.