Zines

A zine in tribute to a maligned beauty of pop culture's past: the compact cassette tape. Twenty writers, musicians, DJs, label owners, publishers, and comic artists tell stories of how cassette tapes have affected their lives, for better or worse. 

Within: the art of the mixtape, the importance of the boombox, the intimacy of the Walkman. Plus tales of recording with cassettes, performing with cassettes, releasing cassettes, falling in love with cassettes...[ continued ]

How does Cometbus, after 38 years as a zine, just get better and better? It's a mystery, but it does. Issue 59 is a deep dive into both death and longevity in the underground. In short: what does sustainability look like in counterculture? This question takes Aaron on a journey from the Epitaph Records and Thrasher magazine offices to hanging out at a punk-owned vegan donut shop and a tamale stand at the farmer's market with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile and Sex Stains fame)...[ continued ]

This DIY punk venue history is more than just an archive of the 21st-century Boston punk scene (though it is, very much, that), but also a brief history of DIY venues in general. Tracking the beginnings of the anti-corporate punk spirit of the late '70s and early '80s, to the "no stage" ethos of the early '90s, to the house show culture of the 2000s, this zine is for anyone interested in DIY culture...[ continued ]

Shit's Fucked, Still is the long-awaited follow-up to our own Gina Sarti's tiny bestselling zine of useful suggestions for getting through tough times. And would you believe: it's even better than the first! Sweet, personal, practical, fun, and down to earth. 

Within: bad mood bag, home museum, floating flowers, magical Mondays, bathroom poems, comfort potatoes, and so much more...[ continued ]

The latest in Jennifer Williams' well-loved workbook zine series. We Need Emotional Labor: Discussion Questions to Redistribute the Work that Holds Communities Together​ is an essential guide to understanding both the value of emotional labor and the imbalance of it.

In her in-depth introduction, Williams asks, "What toxic systems can be uprooted if we start to wipe away the idea that taking care of each other is a burden?" While also pointing out that "There are questions we need to ask, though, before this giving and receiving: Is it consensual? Is it valued? Is it reciprocal?" (Clementine Morrigan...[ continued ]