Just Added

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys. A fascinating in-depth interview with graffiti historian Susan A. Phillips (The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles GraffitiWallbangin'). Linda Kite on her life with D Boon of Minutemen and seeing the '80s L.A. punk scene as conceptual art. Sergej Vutuc's dream-like skateboarding photography. Gary Floyd (of Dicks and Sister Double Happiness) on being a gay Texan punk in the 1970s and touring with Nirvana the year Nevermind broke. And legendary train-graffiti artist buZ blurr (AKA- Colossus of Roads) at the center of everything, holding everyone together. 

56 pages, cut half-letter size.

In this, the latest issue of the long-running Lowbrow Reader, there are napkin-style cartoons from both Dave Eggers and the late-great David Berman. There's a deep-dive into 1988's most popular meme ("Hey! it's Enrico Pallazzo!") and the spoof-movie empire that created it (from Brian Abrams, author of Obama: An Oral History). There's a two-panel comic tribute to Professor Irwin Corey. And, in the issue's most glorious moment, editor Jay Ruttenberg connects the short-lived early '90s fame of Andrew Dice Clay to Pee-wee Herman, Superman, Andy Kaufman, eye surgery, Jerry Lewis, Jewish writers and entertainers as architects of American pop culture, The Beastie Boys, and Natasha Lyonne.

Obviously, The Lowbrow Reader is not your typical zine. But it's also, every time, oddly more than it lets on. It's a long gaze at the things that make us (or, at least, at one time made us) laugh.

With illustrations from John Mathias, Nathan Gelgud, Doreen Kirchner, Sam Henderson, Phillip Niemeyer, Mike Reddy, and Tom Sanford. 

44 pages, half-letter size.

A zine in celebration of the 10-year anniversary of Skybird Radio's revamp, a radio project continuing the legacy of Gary Bourgeois' early online radio station of eccentricities. Look at it as a document of modern weirdo radio history.

30 pages, half-letter size.

This DIY punk venue history is more than just an archive of the 21st-century Boston punk scene (though it is, very much, that), but also a brief history of DIY venues in general. Tracking the beginnings of the anti-corporate punk spirit of the late '70s and early '80s, to the "no stage" ethos of the early '90s, to the house show culture of the 2000s, this zine is for anyone interested in DIY culture.

An Incomplete History of Long-Gone Illegal Punk Venues in Boston is written by scene veteran Chris Strunk. It's full of fun anecdotes, but also documents the intense aggression of the Boston Police and the gentrification and noise ordinances that shut down much of the DIY venue culture. A fascinating read!

40 pages, half-letter size. Free the Future Press.

The long-awaited LP version of Flying Circles' flawless debut album! Colleen Johnson (of Silver Shadows), Evan Hashi (of Little Angry), and Preston Bryant (of AJJ) combine to make angular post-punk synthy dream-pop ecstasy. The most critically-adored Antiquated Future Records release. 

Black vinyl in black sleeve with silver and white ink. Artwork by Rachel Cleveland and Evan Hashi. Digital download included. Listen on Bandcamp.

"a near-perfect rock record" - Justin Spicer, Tiny Mix Tapes' Cerberus 

"Sporting the usual angularity of post-punk's guitar lineage, they add in various other rhythmic elements until the mix is so wonderfully disparate that influences seem to be thrown out the window and the band appears to be operating on pure inspiration." - Joshua Pickard, The Tape Deck 

Flying Circles- Diamond Eye

The best zine about zines around. Within: Sarah Mirk's joy-inducing stories about her Year of Zines project. Corinne Halbert's "Zany Zinetiquette" comics. Gianni Simone's stories of how his early 2000s zines led to becoming a freelance writer in Japan. Ed Kemp and Mark Cunning's home copier treatises. Todd Taylor's personal history of Razorcake frugality. Liz Mason's hilarious Quimby's "Zine Data Mining." Brian Polk's brilliant imagined zines.

Not to mention words and pictures from zine superstars like: Anna Jo Beck, Nyx, Jenna Freedman, Mike Faloon, Johnnie B. Baker, and Ed Tillman.

Cover art by Sarah Mirk. 40 pages, half-letter size.

Four essays from Portland zinester and children's book author Cathy Camper (Lowriders in Space) about Arab-American identity, being a Brown person in mostly white settings, and biases in beauty standards.

Within: clothing colors by place, The Naked People of Color Bike Ride, pen names for reclaiming power. All pieces originally published in Women of Color Zine and collected together here for the first time.

20 pages, half-letter size.

We're offering free zine packs to those who are struggling financially or emotionally right now. We're in the middle of a revolution in the middle of a pandemic and, given the state of things, it's not much. But hopefully it can be something to help, in a small way, get you (or someone you know) through.

Just like with our zine care packages at the beginning of COVID-19, we won't ask what you're dealing with and you don't need to provide any details. 

Simply CONTACT US and say "hey, I'd love a zine care package," list some subjects you're interested in, provide your mailing address, and we'll send something your way.

[Due to postage costs, and our own precarious financial situation, we can only offer this to folks in the U.S.]

From Aj Michel of the great Syndicate Product zine, I've Worn All the Shirts in the Drawer is a daily diary of quarantine by way of t-shirts. Photos of shirts accompanied by their stories, and a day-by-day account of watching the world crumble. Bleak fun, fandom, and the mundane.

"As the days piled up, I wrote less about the shirts and more about pushing through the days," Aj writes, "what worried, disgusted, and frightened me. This zine project is my way of making sense of a small part of the year 2020."

68 pages, oblong quarter-size.

In Otherwise, their sequel to the excellent All Together workbook zine, Emma Percy guides us through better understanding and connecting to the world around us. Through questions, exercises, quotes, and research, Otherwise explores "ecological identity, climate grief + anger, the precarity + necessity of hope, and sparking creative resistance to the genocidal + ecocidal capitalist system."

44 pages, half-letter size.