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A deep-dive into the animated television show BoJack Horseman, by way of personal essays, comics, tarot, and interviews.

Within: alcoholism, international fandom, the history of screwball comedies, unlikeable cartoon women, absurdism, representation in voice acting, the power of Lisa Hanawalt, and much more. For fans, as well as those who can't understand what there is to love in a cartoon about addiction and depression. 

With words from: Joshua James Amberson, Timothy Day, Jessica Fonvergne, Lauren Hobson, Tessa Livingstone, M.L. Schepps, Jourdain Searles, and Molly E. Simas. Plus an interview with Leca from BoJack Hidden Jokes

Illustrations from: Eileen Chavez, Ross Jackson, Naomi Marshall, and Liz Yerby. Cover and back cover art by Sarah Mirk. 

Winner of the Broken Pencil Best Fanzine of 2020 award. All proceeds from the zine benefit Black Resilience Fund and the National Lawyers Guild.

Printed by Eberhardt Press. 68 pages, half-letter size. 

A zine in tribute to a maligned beauty of pop culture's past: the compact cassette tape. Twenty writers, musicians, DJs, label owners, publishers, and comic artists tell stories of how cassette tapes have affected their lives, for better or worse. 

Within: the art of the mixtape, the importance of the boombox, the intimacy of the Walkman. Plus tales of recording with cassettes, performing with cassettes, releasing cassettes, falling in love with cassettes. Nostalgia, subversion, frustration, possibility.

Contributions from: Andrew Barton, Ariel Birks, Karleigh Frisbie Brogan, Aaron Burch, Laura Daegling, Tim Devin, Fukumup, Aaron Gilbreath, Cynthia Carmina Gómez, Jack Lewis, Chask'e Lindgren, Pat Maley, Jason Martin, Sara Renberg, Kevin Sampsell, Gina Sarti, Christopher Sutton, Tucker Theodore, and Alexis Wolf.

Cover art by Rachel Lee-Carman. Risograph-printed throughout by Whatnow Press. 60 pages, half-letter size. 

4 vintage vinyl records from our extensive collection. All in good condition with minor to moderate shelf wear, all previewed to make sure they play fairly well. 

Each grab bag comes with a wide variety of genres. Pop from all eras, tons of jazz, soul, punk-adjacent, yacht rock, funk, folk revival, garage rock, novelties, and beyond.

A great deal for the adventurous listener.

One Punk's Guide to Star Trek is both a great read and an accessible guide for the newcomer (as well as those who have just dipped a toe into the Trek universe). Effortlessly summing up the complex backstories and timelines, Seattle Trekkie-punk Kayla Greet gives a primer to 50+ years of the best in secular-humanist social-commentary sci-fi television programming. 

Focusing on The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine, but also covering previous and present series, she gives a brief explanation of each and lists key entry-point episodes. It's hard to come out of this zine without wanting to watch!

There's also plenty of fantastic lines about what Star Trek says about the world-at-large and what it inspires in her. As she writes in the zine, "When I feel stuck as a working class citizen just trying to make it to the next paycheck among people who have more than they'll ever need, as well as people struggling even worse than me, I think of the Federation and how I can implement and model that type of society in the world around me. It feeds my brain with possibilities and my heart with hope. So if you ask me, Star Trek is just about as punk as it gets."

Illustrated by Ben Snakepit (of Snake Pit zine), edited by Todd Taylor (of Razorcake). 32 pages, half-letter size.

The new chapbook from Andria Alefhi (of the long-running literary zine We'll Never Have Paris) is a look at grief over time. Told through journal entries, letters, and short essay-like chapters, it documents 16 years of memories, regrets, and personal growth.

Both a grief memoir and a tool for those preparing for parent loss and others who have lost a parent to write their own story, When Your Mom is First to Go is a unique journey through living with loss and finding paths to acceptance. 

Cover art by Gabriel Liston. 64 pages, quarter-size.

Justin Hocking's daily erasure project of Donald Trump's book The Art of the Deal has been one of the bright spots of 2020. Through whiting out large portions of the text, Justin finds the true, miserable and hilarious essence of each page.

This short zine is a peek at the larger project and an excerpt from the 25-page e-zine, both of which are a benefit for Portland's Black Resilience Fund.

8 pages, half-letter size. 

Five postcards of cool oddball street photography from Ben Charles Trogdon, the editor behind the zine and magazine series Nuts! and Tattoo Punk

Large-size, full-color.

The new issue of one of our very favorite zines. Each issue is such a treat, such a surprise. Within: trying to be still, drawing nightjars, tree history, Audubon's weird-ass journals. Wrapped in twine with a postcard and plant ID card inside.

Letterpressed text, twine-bound. 32 pages, oblong quarter-size.

Icarus Phoenix's debut full-length is a perfect piece of well-produced languid and dreamy indie-pop. The perfect soundtrack to so many easy-going days, introspective moments.

The new project of long-running folk troubadour Drew Danburry. Echoes of early Pedro the Lion, Sufjan Stevens, Hello Shark, The National, and Tindersticks.

Released on Telos Tapes. Listen on Bandcamp.

A fantastic new issue of the long-running Fluke Fanzine, this time focused on outsider art. Full of odd connections, scenes crossing over, countercultures meeting. Graffiti subcultures, freight-train monikers, '80s skateboarding culture, punk history, experimental film, queercore.

Within: filmmaker Bill Daniel (of Who is Bozo Texino? fame) on the influence of early '90s Cometbus and Sluggo! zines, photographer Garry Winogrand, and '80s Texas skate-punk band the Big Boys. A fascinating in-depth interview with graffiti historian Susan A. Phillips (The City Beneath: A Century of Los Angeles GraffitiWallbangin'). Linda Kite on her life with D Boon of Minutemen and seeing the '80s L.A. punk scene as conceptual art. Sergej Vutuc's dream-like skateboarding photography. Gary Floyd (of Dicks and Sister Double Happiness) on being a gay Texan punk in the 1970s and touring with Nirvana the year Nevermind broke. And legendary train-graffiti artist buZ blurr (AKA- Colossus of Roads) at the center of everything, holding everyone together. 

56 pages, cut half-letter size.